How to communicate like a Buddhist — mindfully and without judgment
10/09/2015 11:20 (GMT+7)
San Francisco, CA (USA) -- There’s a lot that used to frustrate me about communicating. Well, if I’m honest, it was that I didn’t know how to do it. I knew how to speak and string words together, but no one ever sat me down and taught me the purpose of communication or how to effectively express myself so I was heard and how to listen so I could understand. A lot of times it seemed that because I knew how to talk, that automatically meant I should know how to communicate.
Muktinath: An Exemplar of Religious Symbiosis
18/02/2015 19:01 (GMT+7)
“ . . . I accept all religions that were in the past, and worship with them all; I worship God with every one of them, in whatever form they worship Him. . . .” – Swami Vivekananda (Green Message)

Lama Zopa Rinpoche's Online Advice Book Emotions: Fears
19/11/2013 18:03 (GMT+7)
Rinpoche gave the following advice on how to put an end to worry. Rather than staying worried, recite Mani mantras to purify past negative karma, then there’s no need to worry. Everything dies—everything grows and dies, comes and goes—so our main aim should be enlightenment. All other things are not important.
What is Sexual Misconduct?
25/10/2013 08:43 (GMT+7)
What is “sexual misconduct” (kamesu micchacara)? Here are two definitions in the Buddha’s own words.

Marriage – a Dhamma point of view
20/10/2013 12:56 (GMT+7)
Marriage forms an integral part of our lives. Thus, before we enter this union, we need to analyse carefully the reason why we marry. If we cannot find a good reason, it means that we are probably not ready to marry. Love alone is not reliable, because it is likely we may change our minds later. There should be something greater, something that makes a marriage worthwhile, a binding of two lives.
Sickness & Old Age
23/07/2013 16:26 (GMT+7)
Since we are subject to birth, old age, sickness, death, and we suffer from dissatisfaction and unhappiness, we are sick people. The Buddha is compared to an experienced and skilful physician, and the Dhamma is compared with the proper medicine; but however efficient the physician may be, and however wonderful the medicine may be, we cannot be cured unless and until we ourselves actually take the medicine. It would seem that many of us are in need of some medicine to cure us of our misunderstanding of one another, our impatience, irritability, lack of sympathy and metta.

Compassion as Training
17/07/2013 08:53 (GMT+7)
In Buddhism, the ideal of practice is to selflessly act to alleviate suffering wherever it appears. You may argue it is impossible to elminate suffering, and maybe it is, yet we’re to respond anyway.
Loving-Kindness & Compassion
17/07/2013 08:48 (GMT+7)
Metta, loving-kindness, is to be started within ourselves. If we can say that we love ourselves, can we harm ourselves by having angry thoughts within ourselves? If we love a person, will we do harm to him? to love the self means to be free from selfishness, hatred, anger, etc.; and unless we ourselves possess metta within, we cannot share or radiate, we cannot send this metta to others.

When Psychotherapy meets Buddhism
16/07/2013 19:15 (GMT+7)
Psychologist and management guru Dr. Daniel Goleman, Ph.D., is probably American Buddhism’s finest journalist, and was nominated twice for the Pilitzer Price. His book Emotional Intelligence in 1995 introduced millions of people the very Buddhist concept that self-awareness and empathy or EQ are essential to success in life. In his latest book, Destructive Emotions:
There are two people who are not easy to repay
23/06/2013 10:31 (GMT+7)
I tell you, monks, there are two people who are not easy to repay. Which two?Your mother & father.

Who is an Outcast ?
23/06/2013 10:21 (GMT+7)
The Ten Characteristics of a Devotee
15/05/2013 11:15 (GMT+7)

Life and Living
06/05/2013 16:10 (GMT+7)
“Just as a candle cannot burn without fire, men cannot live without a spiritual life.”
The Roots of Buddhist Romanticism
25/03/2013 22:26 (GMT+7)
Many Westerners, when new to Buddhism, are struck by the uncanny familiarity of what seem to be its central concepts: interconnectedness, wholeness, ego-transcendence. But what they may not realize is that the concepts sound familiar because they are familiar. To a large extent, they come not from the Buddha’s teachings but from the Dharma gate of Western psychology, through which the Buddha’s words have been filtered. They draw less from the root sources of the Dharma than from their own hidden roots in Western culture: the thought of the German Romantics.

Is Universal Metta Possible?
26/01/2013 10:03 (GMT+7)
Singapore -- Now that the year-end holidays have passed, so have the barrage of entreaties to nurture a sense of “good will to all mankind,” to extend our love and care to others beyond our usual circle of friends and family. Certainly, this is a message we are meant to take to heart not just in December but all year long. It is a central ideal of several religious and ethical systems.
Concept of healing in Buddhism
03/01/2013 10:54 (GMT+7)
The Buddha said that it is the responsibility and duty of the community to look after the sick Colombo, Sri Lanka -- The Buddha encouraged his disciples to look after the sick. The Blessed One made this famous statement “He who attends the sick attends me,” when he discovered a desperately ill monk with an acute attack of dysentery, lying in his grubby robes. On this occasion the Buddha with the help of Ananda Thera washed and cleaned the sick monk with warm water. He said that it is the responsibility and duty of the community to look after the sick.

The Buddhist path and social responsibility
02/01/2013 13:31 (GMT+7)
One of the most important questions we come to in spiritual practice is how to reconcile service and responsible action with a meditative life based on nonattachment, letting go, and coming to understand the ultimate emptiness of all conditioned things. Do the values that lead us to actively give, serve, and care for one another differ from the values that lead us deep within ourselves on a journey of liberation and awakening? To consider this question, we must first learn to distinguish among four qualities central to spiritual practice--love, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity--and what might be called their "near enemies." Near enemies may seem to be very close to these qualities and may even be mistaken for them, but they are not fundamentally alike.
Therapy And Meditation
01/01/2013 16:46 (GMT+7)
A Path To Wholeness A Buddhist psychiatrist who has been meditating for decades elegantly describes how psychotherapy and meditation can help us manage our most powerful emotions--and make us feel more alive and whole in the process.

Storage Consciousness
28/08/2012 23:26 (GMT+7)
To be aware of the normally ungraspable depth of alaya's memory bank constitutes "liberation." Its rising fully into consciousness is the actualization of the innate Buddha Mind, known as Enlightenment. A Zen Master questioned by one of his monks about the nature of the alayavijnana answered: "I know not. It makes one think!"
Toward A Buddhist Social Ethics: The Case Of Thailand Conduct Of Life
08/07/2012 05:30 (GMT+7)
Buddhism is often criticized as a religion that, being mainly concerned with personal salvation, lacks a social ethics. Although this may seem to be true, Buddhist teachings on personal conduct do contain principles that could be reinterpreted and extended to a social ethical theory. Thailand offers a good framework in which to approach Buddhist social ethics, for it provides an opportunity to examine sociopolitical issues under the global market economy at a structural level and from a Third World point of view.

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