A Buddhist Ethic Without Karmic Rebirth?
05/02/2010 11:14 (GMT+7)
Is a viable and authentic Buddhist ethic possible without the prospect of rebirth governed by one's karmic past? This paper explores traditional and contemporary views on karma with a view to determining the importance of this doctrine for practical ethics in the West. The Theravāda emphasis on the personal nature of karma is discussed first, followed by a consideration of the evolution of a social dimension to the doctrine in the Mahāyāna.
Are There “Human Rights” in Buddhism?
05/02/2010 11:18 (GMT+7)
It is difficult to think of a more urgent question for Buddhism in the late twentieth century than human rights. Human rights issues in which Buddhism has a direct involvement, notably in the case of Tibet, feature regularly on the agenda in superpower diplomacy. The political, ethical and philosophical questions surrounding human rights are debated vigourously in political and intellectual circles throughout the world. Yet despite its contemporary significance, the subject has merited hardly a footnote in mainstream academic research and publication in the field of Buddhist Studies.

Buddhism and Medical Ethics: A Bibliographic Introduction
05/02/2010 11:25 (GMT+7)
This article provides an introduction to some contemporary issues in medical ethics and the literature which addresses them from a Buddhist perspective. The first part of the article discusses Buddhism and medicine and outlines some of the main issues in contemporary medical ethics. In the rest of the paper three subjects are considered: i) moral personhood, ī) abortion, and īi) death, dying and euthanasia.
Buddhism and the Morality of Abortion
05/02/2010 11:30 (GMT+7)
It is quite clear from a variety of sources that abortion has been severely disapproved of in the Buddhist tradition. It is also equally clear that abortion has been tolerated in Buddhist Japan and accommodated under exceptional circumstances by some modern Buddhists in the U.S. (1) Those sources most often cited that prohibit abortion are Theravaadin and ancient. By contrast, Japanese Buddhism as well as the traditions out of which a more lenient approach emerges are more recent and Mahaayaana traditions.

Buddhist Ethics in Western Context: The Virtues Approach
05/02/2010 11:35 (GMT+7)
Contemporary Buddhism increasingly seeks to make itself understood in modern terms and to respond to contemporary conditions. Buddhism's legitimation in the West can be partially met by demonstrating that Buddhist morality is a virtue-oriented, character-based, community-focused ethics, commensurate with the Western "ethics of virtue" tradition.
Compassion
05/02/2010 11:38 (GMT+7)
On behalf of all the people of Tibet, I would like to thank all those who have taken an interest in the culture of Tibet and its traditions, both spiritual and secular. I thank you for all you are doing to make sure these traditions do not disappear.

Curbing Anger Spreading Love
18/04/2010 02:54 (GMT+7)
Ideally, education is the principal tool of human growth, essential for transforming the unlettered child into a mature and responsible adult. Yet everywhere today, both in the developed world and the developing world, we can see that formal education is in serious trouble. Classroom instruction has become so routinized and flat that children often consider school an exercise in patience rather than an adventure in learning.
Emotions - Working with Anger
18/04/2010 02:53 (GMT+7)
Anger seems to be an emotion that people have a lot of difficulty with, so I'd like to talk about how to deal specifically when such an emotion occurs. Say you're sitting and anger appears and you think, "Oh no - anger!" - that's resistance. But what about, "Oh, great, anger!"? Do you see the difference? We are usually very accepting of the moment when the bird sings, but with anger it is more difficult.

Happiness, Unhappiness and Nibbana
18/04/2010 02:53 (GMT+7)
The goal of Buddhist meditation is Nibbana. We incline towards the peace of Nibbana and away from the complexities of the sensual realm, the endless cycles of habit. Nibbana is a goal that can be realised in this lifetime, we don't have to wait until we die to know if it's real.
Homosexuality and Theravada Buddhism
18/04/2010 02:50 (GMT+7)
Buddhism teaches to, and expects from, its followers a certain level of ethical behaviour. The minimum that is required of the lay Buddhist is embodied in what is called the Five Precepts (panca sila), the third of which relates to sexual behaviour. Whether or not homosexuality, sexual behaviour between people of the same sex, would be breaking the third Precept is what I would like to examine here.

In Search of a Meaningful Life
18/04/2010 02:50 (GMT+7)
Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche is the foremost disciple of Lama Thubten Yeshe and a highly revered teacher in his own right. He has taught the graduated path to enlightenment to thousands of people, over one hundred of whom have taken ordination as monks and nuns. This teaching was given at Tushita on July 4th, 1979.
Mindfulness: The Path to the Deathless
18/04/2010 02:53 (GMT+7)
We are here with one common interest among all of us. Instead of a room of individuals all following their own views and opinions, tonight we are all here because of a common interest in the practice of the Dhamma. When this many people come together on Sunday night, you begin to see the potential for human existence, a society based on this common interest in the truth. In the Dhamma we merge.

Buddhist Ethics and Young People in Myanmar
11/02/2010 10:39 (GMT+7)
In this age of free-thinking and globalization, some lose faith in their own religion and some retain it even stronger than before.  This paper will look at the experience of the Buddhist youth of Myanmar.  In so doing, I will use my own experience of working with youth for many years through special Buddhist trainings for youth and how in those trainings, the Mangala-sutta and the Dhammapāda have been applied not just to activate and energize but also to widen and deepen the Buddhist ethical views among the youth.
A Universally Beneficial Economic Ethic: The Buddhist Perspective
11/02/2010 10:39 (GMT+7)
The early history of Buddhism, as recorded in the canonical texts, shows that it started as a limited movement of renouncers.   These renouncers adopted an itinerant way of life, totally aloof from all secular commitments, with minimum needs, completely devoted to the practice of the noble life (Brahamacāriya) for the purpose fully putting an end to suffering (dukkha). 

The Positive Significance Of Buddhist Ethics To Social Development
11/02/2010 10:38 (GMT+7)
Mundane ethics is secular, and refers to adjusting ethical relationships and improving the moral standard of the spirit realm in mundane life, and deals with relations between: individual to individual, individual to society, and human to nature. 
Nalanda Education — the Basis of Buddhist Ethics
11/02/2010 10:37 (GMT+7)
  Dhamma or Dharma is the ultimate foundation for the Buddhist ethics.  The term Dhamma is a multi-significant term but the study of Pāli literature reveals two main meanings of the word Dharma which has been preserved throughout the ages.

Buddhist Ethics and Education
11/02/2010 10:36 (GMT+7)
Buddhism is a religious ideological system rooted in seeking detachment against perplexity, improper thoughts, and distresses of birth and death; and it is a life-education system aimed at guiding human beings towards a more civilized and perfect life. 
Probe into Buddhist “Ethical Economics”
11/02/2010 10:36 (GMT+7)
 It can be seen from the very definition of economy and ethics: economics suggests meeting material needs, and ethics should meet spiritual needs. Material culture and spiritual culture are two basic essentials for human life and activities, and none of them are considered dispensable.

A Buddhist Ethic Without Karmic Rebirth?
09/09/2010 10:45 (GMT+7)
Is a viable and authentic Buddhist ethic possible without the prospect of rebirth governed by one's karmic past? This paper explores traditional and contemporary views on karma with a view to determining the importance of this doctrine for practical ethics in the West.
Buddhist Ethics in Western Context: The Virtues Approach
25/02/2010 04:53 (GMT+7)
Contemporary Buddhism increasingly seeks to make itself understood in modern terms and to respond to contemporary conditions. Buddhism's legitimation in the West can be partially met by demonstrating that Buddhist morality is a virtue-oriented, character-based, community-focused ethics, commensurate with the Western "ethics of virtue" tradition.

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