• Interfaith Gathering at An-Nur Mosque in Sibu, Malaysia

    Interfaith Gathering at An-Nur Mosque in Sibu, Malaysia

    On 15 August, around 200 Buddhists, Christians, Hindus, and Sikhs attended an interfaith gathering in the compound of An-Nur Mosque in Sibu, in the Malaysian state of Sarawak, to coincide with celebrations for the Hari Raya festival. According to the Borneo Post Online, the participants included representatives of seven Buddhist associations, several Hindu and Sikh temples, and the Association of Churches Sarawak (ACS), Sibu branch, which is comprised of the Roman Catholic, Methodist, Sidang Injil Borneo (SIB), and Anglican churches.
  • Chinese Government Orders Larung Gar Buddhist Institute to Reduce Admissions

    Chinese Government Orders Larung Gar Buddhist Institute to Reduce Admissions

    The Chinese authorities have ordered Larung Gar Buddhist Institute in Sertar County, in western China’s Sichuan Province, to reduce admissions—in particular of nuns, and of monks and nuns from other regions of China—in an effort to curb the rapid growth of the monastery’s population.
  • Buddhist chaplain helps deliver six Parapan Am medals

    Buddhist chaplain helps deliver six Parapan Am medals

    TORONTO, Canada -- The Buddhist chaplain who helped guide athletes to six medals at the Pan Am Games helped to deliver six more medals at the recently completed Parapan Ams.
  • Only Compassion Can Counter Intolerance in Buddhist Societies

    Only Compassion Can Counter Intolerance in Buddhist Societies

    A perceived increase in intolerance and extremist ideologies has been a growing concern across the global political and religious landscape in recent years. No community, it seems, is immune from such conservatism, including Buddhist societies in South and Southeast Asia. However, while there may appear to be commonalities to conflicts between Buddhists and Muslims in Myanmar, Thailand, and Sri Lanka when viewed from afar, the fault lines of violence are rooted in very specific historical, contextual, and localized issues and circumstances.
  • The Dalai Lama Reiterates Retirement from Political Activity

    The Dalai Lama Reiterates Retirement from Political Activity

    In a recent interview from his official residence in Dharamsala, northern India, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, who in July celebrated his 80th birthday, reiterated that he has completely retired from political activity.
  • Sixty Enroll for Free Sanskrit Summer Camp in Hangzhou

    Sixty Enroll for Free Sanskrit Summer Camp in Hangzhou

    Sixty Chinese students enrolled at Hangzhou Buddhism Institute in China’s eastern Zhejiang Province this month for a free six-day summer camp to study Sanskrit, the literary and liturgical language of Buddhism and other religions. Amid the growing popularity of Buddhism, yoga, and Indology in China, the study of this ancient Indian language is rapidly gaining traction among a new generation of students.
  • Former Buddhist Monk Establishes School for Needy Children

    Former Buddhist Monk Establishes School for Needy Children

    Spurred by the shadow of his own troubled childhood, former Tibetan Buddhist monk Lobsang Phuntsok decided that his mission in this life was to create a haven for neglected children near his home in Tawang, a remote corner of Arunachal Pradesh in the northern Indian Himalayas. Phuntsok envisioned an educational community for at-risk children founded on the principles of love, compassion, and wisdom, which form the core of his own Buddhist background.
  • Buddhist Monks Reopen Bomb-damaged Erawan Shrine to the Public

    Buddhist Monks Reopen Bomb-damaged Erawan Shrine to the Public

    Buddhist monks led a ritual at Bangkok’s Erawan Shrine on Wednesday morning for the victims of Monday’s deadly bomb attack as the popular shrine reopened to the public. The monks chanted to guide the spirits of those killed, and received offerings of lotus flowers and incense from grief-stricken relatives of the victims.
  • Amaravati all set to be Mahayana Buddhist centre

    Amaravati all set to be Mahayana Buddhist centre

    Andhra Pradesh, India -- The ancient town of Amaravati, which forms part of the upcoming capital region of the State, will be promoted as a cradle of Mahayana Buddhism to attract international tourists, particularly those from China, Japan, Thailand and other Asian countries.
  • Millionaire businessman gives up his possessions to become a Buddhist monk in China after living in isolation for two years

    Millionaire businessman gives up his possessions to become a Buddhist monk in China after living in isolation for two years

    Guangdong, China -- A Chinese millionaire has given up his fortune and all material possessions in order to become a Buddhist monk. Liu Jingchong, a businessman from Guangdong Province, moved into the mountains to live in total isolation after an epiphany in 2012 made him desire a 'minimalist life'.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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