• Buddhist Monks Working to Tackle Deforestation in Cambodia

    Buddhist Monks Working to Tackle Deforestation in Cambodia

    Deforestation remains a major threat to Cambodia’s forests, but a group of Cambodian Buddhist monks from the Independent Monk Network for Social Justice is battling to save these forests by lobbying lawmakers to protect them and by publicly exposing illegal logging.
  • University of Wales Trinity Saint David and Chin Kung Multicultural Educational Foundation Launch Academy of Sinology

    University of Wales Trinity Saint David and Chin Kung Multicultural Educational Foundation Launch Academy of Sinology

    Britain’s University of Wales Trinity Saint David and the Hong Kong-based Chin Kung Multi-Cultural Educational Foundation (CKMEF) this week launched a joint Academy of Sinology in Wales aimed at developing a range of postgraduate programs and cultural events for the university.
  • Archaeologists Unearth Possible Fragments of the Largest Buddhist Pagoda Ever Built in Japan

    Archaeologists Unearth Possible Fragments of the Largest Buddhist Pagoda Ever Built in Japan

    Archaeologists in Japan have identified three decorative bronze fragments unearthed in the grounds of Kyoto’s famous Kinkaku-ji Zen Buddhist temple as the remains of what might once have been the tallest Buddhist pagoda ever built in Japan.
  • Exhibition on Shanxi Buddhist Art and Intangible Cultural Heritage Opens to Public

    Exhibition on Shanxi Buddhist Art and Intangible Cultural Heritage Opens to Public

    The Exhibition on Shanxi Buddhist Art and Intangible Cultural Heritage opens today on 19 July at the Great Sage Monastery of Bamboo Grove (Dasheng Zhulin Si) on Mount Wutai, the mythic dwelling of the bodhisattva Manjushri. There is no exact concluding date, but the exhibit is expected to extend over the summer.
  • Twenty Tibetan Nuns Make History by Passing Geshema Degree

    Twenty Tibetan Nuns Make History by Passing Geshema Degree

    Twenty Tibetan Buddhist nuns in Dharamsala, in the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, have achieved the remarkable by becoming the first Tibetan women to graduate with Geshema degrees, equivalent to a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy, the Department of Religion and Culture of the Central Tibetan Administration has announced.
  • Nepal’s Largest Stone Buddha Ready for Viewing

    Nepal’s Largest Stone Buddha Ready for Viewing

    Nepal’s largest stone Buddha is now open to the public. Situated at an altitude of 12,600 feet in Mustang’s Muktinath Valley, the Buddha was erected in the vicinity of Muktinath Temple, a pilgrimage spot for both Hindus and Buddhists, and has a height of 32 feet. The statue is reportedly made from a special stone from Pharping, a sacred site to the southwest of Nepal’s capital, Kathmandu. (The Huffington Post)
  • “Great Prayer Festival” Held at Kagyu Thubten Chöling Monastery in New York

    “Great Prayer Festival” Held at Kagyu Thubten Chöling Monastery in New York

    Around 500 Buddhist teachers, monastics, practitioners, and guests from around the world were present at the 2016 North American Kagyu Monlam, or “Great Prayer Festival,” held at the Tibetan Buddhist monastery Kagyu Thubten Chöling in Wappingers Falls, New York, from 6–10 July. Overseen by Lama Norlha Rinpoche with blessings from His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, the event was led by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche, who also gave teachings and empowerments.
  • Ithaca in New York Selected as Site for the Dalai Lama’s Library and Museum

    Ithaca in New York Selected as Site for the Dalai Lama’s Library and Museum

    On 6 July, the mayor of Ithaca Svante Myrick announced that His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama had accepted a proposal that an international center for Buddhist practice and study be built in the city. The mayor made the announcement during a visit to the city’s Namgyal Monastery and Institute of Buddhist Studies (or Namgyal Ithaca)—which had proposed the idea of the center in January this year—where he joined celebrations in honor of the Dalai Lama’s 81st birthday. The Dalai Lama last visited Ithaca in 2007.
  • Designated Hub of Maharashtra Buddhist Circuit Still Neglected

    Designated Hub of Maharashtra Buddhist Circuit Still Neglected

    Despite a decision in 2014 to make the 2,500-year-old Nalasopara Stupa in Maharashtra, India, the hub of the state’s Buddhist circuit, the site still lies largely neglected, according to a recent report in The Indian Express. “Every evening, few locals come and sit on the benches bordering the stupa to enjoy a whiff of the evening air,” said a local living in a hut nearby. “In the past few years, the number of pilgrims have steadily been increasing but infrastructure remains the same.” (The Indian Express) According to the report, there is not even a sign leading to the site.
  • Gyalwang Drukpa Leads Cyclists on 4th Drukpa Eco Cycle Yatra

    Gyalwang Drukpa Leads Cyclists on 4th Drukpa Eco Cycle Yatra

    His Holiness the Gyalwang Drukpa is on the road again. On 3 July the enterprising head of the Drukpa Kagyu lineage kicked off the 4th Drukpa Eco Cycle Yatra, this time leading 500 cyclists from Kathmandu, Nepal to Hemis in Ladakh. The participants are made up mainly of the famous Drukpa Kung Fu nuns from Druk Gawa Khilwa Nunnery at Druk Amitabha Mountain in the hills of Kathmandu and fellow martial monastics from Naro Photang Nunnery on the outskirts of Leh, Ladakh.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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