• The 11th Nehru Memorial Lecture at Jawaharlal Nehru University

    The 11th Nehru Memorial Lecture at Jawaharlal Nehru University

    New Delhi, India, 20 November 2014 - Arriving at the Jawaharlal Nehru University campus, nestled on the northernmost reaches of the Arravali Hills, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was today received by the Chancellor, Prof. K. Kasturirangan, the Vice-Chancellor, Prof. S. K. Sopory and other members of the administration. He spent a few minutes in consultation with them.
  • "Monk with a Camera" to Premiere in New York

    Monk with a Camera, a documentary about the life and photographic artwork of the Tibetan Buddhist monk Nicholas Vreeland (Khen Rinpoche), will premiere on 21 November at New York City’s Lincoln Center. The 7.20 p.m. screening will include a Q&A session with Khen Rinpoche and directors Tina Mascara and Guido Santi, while at the 5.20 p.m. screening the following day Khen Rinpoche and Richard Gere will have a public conversation about the film. Khen Rinpoche is the name that Nicholas Vreeland has gone by since 2012.
  • Indian Police Chief Recommends Meditation for Officers

    Indian Police Chief Recommends Meditation for Officers

    Having found it beneficial himself, a district police commissioner has recommended that his officers practice meditation in order to better perform their duties. The police chief, Hasmukh Patel, in Surat, the capital of the Indian state of Gujarat, also strongly recommends yoga. According to Maeve Shearlaw of The Guardian, Mr. Patel is responsible for 3,500 officers. “One cannot be forced,” he says, explaining that it was the personal choice of the officers, who are given full pay and allowances during their training. So far, 175 have taken up meditation, while nearly 500 are practicing yoga.
  • Tracing the Development of Buddha’s Footprints in Bihar

    Tracing the Development of Buddha’s Footprints in Bihar

    In the first week of December, the Bihar government’s Department of Tourism will launch a new scheme to popularize and generate awareness of the state’s Buddhist monuments. Called “walking tourism,” the pilgrimage will start in Bodh Gaya and take in other “Buddha’s footprints” circuit sites in the state. It is expected that both monks and tourists will participate.
  • The Passing of Sik Kok Kwong, Age 95

    The Passing of Sik Kok Kwong, Age 95

    Veteran Chinese monk Sik Kok Kwong, who was highly respected by the Hong Kong community for his devotion to Buddhist charity work, passed away on 16 November at the age of 95.
  • Shang Rinpoche in Australia

    Shang Rinpoche in Australia

    Shang Longrik Gyatso Rinpoche is currently in Melbourne giving Dharma transmissions and teachings. A highly esteemed Buddhist master from Taiwan, Shang Rinpoche has been teaching Buddhism to tens of thousands of students at all levels of experience all over the world for more than 30 years.
  • A Dialogue between Three Major Traditions of Buddhism

    A Dialogue between Three Major Traditions of Buddhism

    While all coming from the same source, Buddha Nature, the various traditions of Buddhism can vary dramatically in their presentations of practice and historical lineage. In all spiritual and philosophical traditions, the variations that arise out of the original teachings eventually become a source of strife between the different schools. As a collection of diverse traditions with a 2,400-year history of emphasizing different aspects of a single teacher’s vast methodologies, Buddhism has certainly been no exception to this tendency.
  • Thich Nhat Hanh Recovering from Brain Hemorrhage

    Thich Nhat Hanh Recovering from Brain Hemorrhage

    Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh is receiving 24-hour intensive care in hospital after suffering a sudden brain hemorrhage on 11 November.  
  • Zen Master Thich Nhat Hahn in intensive care

    Zen Master Thich Nhat Hahn in intensive care

    Thénac, France -- Plum Village, the retreat centre founded by the Venerable Thich Nhat Hahn has announced that the Zen Master has passed into coma due to "severe brain hemorrhage".
  • Buddhist Spring Festival in Australia

    Buddhist Spring Festival in Australia

    On the weekend of 8–9 November, the Tibetan Buddhist Society in Australia held their annual spring festival at the Peaceful Land of Joy Meditation Centre in Yuroke, one hour north of Melbourne. The society has held the festival annually for over 20 years.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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