• Myanmar to Form Buddhist-Muslim Commission to Address Humanitarian Crisis in Rakhine State

    Myanmar to Form Buddhist-Muslim Commission to Address Humanitarian Crisis in Rakhine State

    Myanmar plans to set up a new state-level committee aimed at resolving the humanitarian crisis in the country’s western Rakhine State, home to most of the country’s population of Rohingya Muslims. A government minister said the new nine-member panel would be tasked with liaising with local communities in Rakhine as well as international parties.
  • Buddhist Scholar Ven. Hin Hung Inaugurates Ethics and Virtues Institute of Nepal

    Buddhist Scholar Ven. Hin Hung Inaugurates Ethics and Virtues Institute of Nepal

    At a ceremony held in Kathmandu on Friday, the renowned Buddhist monk and scholar Venerable Hin Hung formally inaugurated the Ethics and Virtues Institute of Nepal (EVINS Nepal) non-governmental organization, during which he gave a keynote address on compassion and the nature of human suffering.
  • Scientists in Nepal Show the Neurological Benefits of Meditation on Buddhist Monks

    Scientists in Nepal Show the Neurological Benefits of Meditation on Buddhist Monks

    Scientists from the University of Victoria and the University of British Columbia in Canada have revealed new findings about the benefits of meditation after investigating its effect on the brains of Buddhist monks at Tengboche Monastery in northeastern Nepal’s Solukhumbu district. Neuroscientist Olav Krigolson, co-leader of the research team, said that the group had studied 27 monks, all of whom are well-versed in meditation, with the aim of exploring how meditation enhances brain function.
  • Muslim Students Help to Rebuild Buddhist Temples in Indonesia

    Muslim Students Help to Rebuild Buddhist Temples in Indonesia

    A video of Muslim students helping to rebuild damaged Buddhist temples has been widely circulated on social media in the wake of a spate of vandalism by violent mobs in Tanjungbalai, a city in the Indonesian province of North Sumatra. The video, showing the students helping to clear up debris and repair damaged walls, was uploaded to Facebook just days after the attacks, where it was shared more than 10,000 times. The original uploader later removed the video, although it can still be found on YouTube.
  • Buddhist Priest Eyes Olympic Gold in Rio

    Buddhist Priest Eyes Olympic Gold in Rio

    As the 2016 Summer Olympics get underway in Brazil, slalom canoeist Kazuki Yazawa, who is representing Japan, may be unique among the hundreds of hopeful athletes competing at the games in the hope of bagging an Olympic medal in that he is also a full-time Buddhist monk.
  • Hyon Gak sunim: “I have deep respect for Buddha Dharma and the Jogye Order,” denies severing ties with Korean Buddhism

    Hyon Gak sunim: “I have deep respect for Buddha Dharma and the Jogye Order,” denies severing ties with Korean Buddhism

    Seoul, South Korea -- On July 28 2016, Harvard-educated American Zen Buddhist monk Hyon Gak sunim, the current abbot of Bulyee Seon Center in Germany, uploaded a strong message on his Facebook account outlining various problems besetting Korean Buddhism.
  • Moscow’s State Museum of Oriental Art Exhibiting Biggest Buddhist Art Collection in Russia

    Moscow’s State Museum of Oriental Art Exhibiting Biggest Buddhist Art Collection in Russia

    The State Museum of Oriental Art (SMOA) in the heart of Moscow is exhibiting Russia’s biggest collection of Buddhist and Asian art, boasting a diverse collection from the Republic of Buryatia in the Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, India, Iran, Mongolia, and Tibet. Visitors can view a unique range of artifacts and art that includes paintings, sculptures, and antiquities from the Middle Ages, such as weapons, jewellery, household items, and textiles.
  • Chinese demolitions at Larung Gar Buddhist institute draw fire

    Chinese demolitions at Larung Gar Buddhist institute draw fire

    Sichuan, China  -- Rights groups on Tuesday called for Chinese authorities to stop forced demolitions at one of the world’s biggest Tibetan Buddhist institutes, saying the move was an attempt to “severely restrict” religious freedoms.
  • University of Chicago Digitally Restoring China’s Tianlongshan Caves With 3D Scanners

    University of Chicago Digitally Restoring China’s Tianlongshan Caves With 3D Scanners

    As part of a remarkable project launched in 2013, the Center for the Art of East Asia (CAEA) in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago is digitally restoring art from China’s Tianlongshan caves with 3D scanners. Since the project's inception, the center has digitized a number of sculptures from the caves that have been gathered from displays and exhibits around the world. To preserve the historical, spatial, and religious contexts of the caves, the CAEA began the process of digitally scanning and imaging the caves and their sculptures in 2014.
  • Beijing hands prestigious Buddhist ceremony in Tibet to “fake” Panchen Lama

    Beijing hands prestigious Buddhist ceremony in Tibet to “fake” Panchen Lama

    Beijing, China -- In a move intended to bolster his profile and religious authority, the controversial Chinese-appointed Panchen Lama, Gyaltsen Norbu will conduct the Tibetan Buddhist ritual called Kalachakra (1) in Tibet between 21 and 24 July. The ceremony tomorrow will be the first time that Gyaltsen Norbu (Ch: Gyaincain Norbu) has conducted the Kalachakra ritual, one of the most important in all of Buddhism. It will also be the first time that it has been carried out inside the heavily-policed Tibet Autonomous Region for 50 years.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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