• Indian Prime Minister Visits Buddhist Sites in Sri Lanka

    Indian Prime Minister Visits Buddhist Sites in Sri Lanka

    From 13–14 March the Indian prime minister Narendra Modi paid an official visit to Sri Lanka, during which he visited several sacred Buddhist sites. The visit was the final leg of a three-nation tour, and the first by an Indian prime minister in 28 years.
  • The Karmapa at Stanford: “Compassion, Technology, and the Environment”

    The Karmapa at Stanford: “Compassion, Technology, and the Environment”

    Concluding a two-day visit to Stanford University, California, as part of his US tour, on 17 March His Holiness the Karmapa gave a talk on the theme “Caring Connections: Compassion, Technology, and the Environment.” The event was co-hosted by Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values.
  • “Dialogue on Vinaya”: Conclave in India Unites Sri Lankan and Tibetan Buddhists

    “Dialogue on Vinaya”: Conclave in India Unites Sri Lankan and Tibetan Buddhists

    An historic conclave that addressed the Vinaya (monastic discipline) was held in India’s capital, New Delhi, earlier this month. The two-day conference concluded on 19 March and was attended by HH the Dalai Lama, the former prime minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile Samdhong Rinpoche, Sri Lankan Buddhist leaders, and monks from both Tibet and Sri Lanka, including members of the Asgiri Chapter (a division of the Sri Lankan monastic order Siam Nikaya) and the president of the Mahabodhi Society.
  • Large “Parinirvana” Statue Unearthed in Pakistan

    Large “Parinirvana” Statue Unearthed in Pakistan

    The archaeological team working at the Bhamala Buddhist archaeological complex in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan, has discovered a large statue of the Buddha in parinirvana, said to be 14–15 meters long, as well as more than 500 other ancient Buddhist artifacts. The massive discovery has been termed “a wealth of history and treasure dating back 2,000 years” (Ancient Origins).
  • Forest abbot warns Sangha reform 'urgent'

    Forest abbot warns Sangha reform 'urgent'

    Bangkok, Thailand -- Thai Buddhism is in crisis. Public faith is constantly eroded by wayward monks, their blatant abuse of the saffron robes, widespread laxity in monks' discipline, fierce competition for monastic ranks, and distortions of Buddhist teachings. 
  • The Dalai Lama’s 80th Birthday to be Marked by Global Compassion Summit

    The Dalai Lama’s 80th Birthday to be Marked by Global Compassion Summit

    The Dalai Lama is to mark his 80th birthday, which falls on 6 July this year, with a three-day Global Compassion Summit. The event is being presented by independent non-profit Friends of the Dalai Lama in partnership with The University of California, Irvine (UCI) and Irvine-based non-profit Center for Living Peace, and will be held from 5–7 July. Tickets go on sale at the summit’s official website on 2 April.
  • Calling for equality

    Calling for equality

    Bangkok, Thailand  -- AS THE world marks International Women's Day today, fair-minded people from around the globe will be celebrating the achievements of women and joining voices to call for greater equality in what is still, in many countries, a male-dominated society.
  • The University of Michigan Announces World’s First Endowed Chair of Thai Buddhism

    The University of Michigan Announces World’s First Endowed Chair of Thai Buddhism

    The University of Michigan, which has one of North America’s largest Buddhist Studies programs, has received a gift of US$2 million to establish a Thai Professorship of Theravada Buddhism, believed to be the first chair of its kind in the world. The gift was from U-M alumnus Amnuay Viravan, who is the former deputy prime minister, finance minister, and foreign minister of Thailand, and was matched by the Crown Property Bureau of Thailand’s Ministry of Finance. The chair will be housed in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.
  • A Longevity Empowerment, ‘Lamp for the Path’ and a Long-Life Offering at Sherabling

    A Longevity Empowerment, ‘Lamp for the Path’ and a Long-Life Offering at Sherabling

    Upper Bhattu, Himachal Pradesh, India, 12 March 2015 - On his way to the Lungrik Jamphel Ling Institute at Palpung Sherabling this morning, His Holiness the Dalai Lama visited first the nuns’ retreat centre and then the Naro Meditation Centre, where monks are in retreat. In both places he recited brief consecration prayers. On reaching the newly constructed Lungrik Jamphel Ling Institute, with Tai Situ Rinpoche beside him, His Holiness cut the ribbon at the door and proceeded directly to the back of the hall where he recited consecrating verses before the statues of Marpa Lotsawa, Manjushri, Buddha Shakyamuni, Guru Rinpoche and Situ Panchen, Chökyi Jungney.
  • His Holiness the Dalai Lama is Given a Warm Welcome at Palpung Sherabling

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama is Given a Warm Welcome at Palpung Sherabling

    Upper Bhattu, Himachal Pradesh, India, 11 March 2015 - Well-wishers, Tibetan and foreign were gathered outside the gate to His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s residence to see him off this morning. Other small groups were waiting see him as he drove down the bumpy Dharamsala roads. Outside Gyutö Tantric College more than 100 monks waited to greet him as he passed, white silk scarves and incense in their hands. At Gopalpur, the entire population of the TCV School, hundreds of children and staff lined the road for 200 metres or more, smiles on their faces and their hands folded together in respect.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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