• Trauma and the Vagus Nerve: When Mindfulness is Not Enough

    Trauma and the Vagus Nerve: When Mindfulness is Not Enough

    While the far-reaching benefits of mindfulness meditation and related practices for improving mental and physical well-being are becoming more widely acknowledged among Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike, what is perhaps not as well understood is that mindfulness alone can be ineffective and can even cause discomfort for the practitioner in cases of deep psychological or emotional trauma.
  • UNESCO Head Commends International Conservation Effort in Lumbini

    UNESCO Head Commends International Conservation Effort in Lumbini

    UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova last week visited Lumbini in southern Nepal, where she commended the work being carried out by an international initiative to conserve and develop the birthplace of the historical Buddha, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1997.
  • Archaeological Evidence of Buddhist Settlements in Odisha Reveals Ancient Trade Routes

    Archaeological Evidence of Buddhist Settlements in Odisha Reveals Ancient Trade Routes

    Archaeologists working on excavations in Puri District, in the eastern Indian state of Odisha (formerly Orissa), have unearthed new evidence of ancient trade routes in the area. The team from the Orissa Institute of Maritime and South Asian Studies (OIMSEAS) said recently excavated Buddhist sites pointed to the existence of both maritime and riverine trade routes, facilitating the spread of Buddhism in the region.
  • Eating Our Way to a Cleaner Planet

    Eating Our Way to a Cleaner Planet

    What happened to the plastic utensils that were left over after your last takeout meal? If you’re like most of us, they ended up being thrown out with the rest of the garbage, another by-product of our unsustainable, “disposable” society.
  • Dalai Lama Lends Weight to Interfaith Climate Change Statement

    Dalai Lama Lends Weight to Interfaith Climate Change Statement

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama was one of 270 senior signatories representing the world’s religions to The Interfaith Climate Change Statement, presenting a united voice calling on world governments to take decisive action on climate change. The statement was formally submitted to Mogens Lykketoft, president of the United Nations General Assembly, in New York on Monday.
  • Sayasaw U Pandita passes away at 95

    Sayasaw U Pandita passes away at 95

    Yangon, Myanmar -- Sayadaw U Pandita, the well known Vipasanna meditation teacher and founder of Panditarama Centers, has passed away on the morning of April 16, 2016. He was 95.
  • World’s Tallest Maitreya Bodhisattva Statue Under Construction in Mongolia

    World’s Tallest Maitreya Bodhisattva Statue Under Construction in Mongolia

    The project is located at a sacred Buddhist site in the Uguumur Valley known as Heart Hill, just outside of Ulaanbaatar, which is believed to be where one of the revered Jebtsundamba Khutuktu, the spiritual heads of the Gelug lineage of Tibetan Buddhism in Mongolia, lived some 300 years ago, said Fouts, adding, “It is very special and auspicious for the Mongolian people to build symbols of love and Buddhist centers on this site, as well as to receive teachings here.” 
  • Recognizing the Rights of Animals as Sentient Beings

    Recognizing the Rights of Animals as Sentient Beings

    “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” These insightful words are commonly attributed to the civil activist and political leader Mahatma Gandhi. And whether or not they were actually expressed by the great man, there can be little doubt that he would agree with the sentiment expressed and would willingly acknowledge what Buddhists, scientists, and animal lovers have long realized—that emotional experiences, pleasure, and pain, are not unique to humans; animals, too, are capable of understanding fear, sadness, anxiety, boredom, and even love.
  • Yangon’s Ancient Sule Pagoda Receives a Glistering Facelift

    Yangon’s Ancient Sule Pagoda Receives a Glistering Facelift

    Standing a little under 145 feet tall and marking the center of bustling downtown Yangon (formerly Rangoon), Myanmar’s ancient Sule Pagoda recently underwent its five-yearly renovation, during which craftsmen removed the Buddhist monument’s weather-worn gilding and encased the spire in new gold plates and thousands of sheets of gold leaf  
  • Ven. Wei Chueh, Founder of the Chung Tai Shan Buddhist Order, Dies at 88

    Ven. Wei Chueh, Founder of the Chung Tai Shan Buddhist Order, Dies at 88

    Buddhist monk Venerable Wei Chueh (唯覺), who founded Taiwan’s Chung Tai Shan Buddhist order and Chung Tai Chan Monastery, has died at the age of 88. The monastery said Wei Chueh passed away on Saturday evening due to complications related to a bone marrow condition. Due to his failing health, Wei Chueh made his last public appearance on 17 January. The monastery is holding daily scripture recitations in remembrance this week until 17 April.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
» Audio
» Photo gallery
» Buddhism Dictionary
» Lunar calendar