• Growing a Greener Planet: Building with Bamboo

    Growing a Greener Planet: Building with Bamboo

    With a higher compressive strength than brick, concrete, or wood, and a tensile strength that rivals steel, bamboo’s utility as a lightweight building material has been known for thousands of years. Now, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, hope to cement the role of this versatile grass species as a sustainable and environmentally friendly building product for the future for emerging economies around the world.
  • Buddhist Monks in Japan Are Only a Click Away

    Buddhist Monks in Japan Are Only a Click Away

    When Amazon.com first became a part of the nascent digital landscape back in 1995, online shoppers could buy only books. In the years since, however, the online retailer’s geographical reach and the range of products on offer have expanded exponentially. In Japan, that diversity has extended to include Buddhist monks for hire, a move that many if the country's Buddhist leaders view as an unseemly corruption of traditional practices.
  • 84000 Marks Launch of New Virtual Reading Room with Release of 10 Translated Tibetan Texts

    84000 Marks Launch of New Virtual Reading Room with Release of 10 Translated Tibetan Texts

    The global non-profit initiative 84000, founded by Bhutanese lama, filmmaker, and writer Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche, which has undertaken to translate and publish the surviving canonical Tibetan texts, has announced the launch of its newly updated online Reading Room. Marking the launch, 84000 also said that 10 newly translated Tibetan Buddhist texts have been released, marking significant progress in the organization’s ambitious mission.
  • Mindfulness Key to Unplugging Children from Online World, Says British MP

    Mindfulness Key to Unplugging Children from Online World, Says British MP

    Edward Timpson, British Conservative MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has urged schools across the UK to teach mindfulness and yoga to help children “unplug from their online world.” An education minister, Timpson emphasized during a debate in Parliament on 7 September that schools need to adapt to the constant presence of the Internet in students’ lives, and that mindfulness is critical in facilitating this adjustment. 
  • Buddhist College of Singapore Opens New US$26m Campus

    Buddhist College of Singapore Opens New US$26m Campus

    Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Buddhist College of Singapore on Saturday unveiled a new S$35 million (US$25.7 million) campus—its first purpose-built premises to accommodate monastic students from around the region.
  • Minnesota Boy Identified as 8th Incarnation of Taksham Lama to Begin Training Next Year

    Minnesota Boy Identified as 8th Incarnation of Taksham Lama to Begin Training Next Year

    Nine-year-old Jalue Dorjee enjoys sports, watching movies on his laptop, and collecting Pokémon cards. However, this otherwise typical boy from Columbia Heights in Minnesota will not live an average life after he turns 10. Jalue was identified by His Holiness the Dalai Lama as the 8th incarnation of Taksham Nueden Dorjee (a Tibetan lama who lived in the 16th century) at the age of 3 on 6 January 2009. The Dalai Lama also conferred on him a formal lama name, Tenzin Gyurme Trinley Dorjee.
  • Obama Tours Temple, Lauds Buddhism in First Visit to Laos by a Sitting US President

    Obama Tours Temple, Lauds Buddhism in First Visit to Laos by a Sitting US President

    US president Barack Obama’s historic and widely publicized visit to Laos—the first by an incumbent US president—included a tour of the ancient northern city of Luang Prabang on Wednesday, where Obama stopped off at a centuries-old Buddhist Temple and posed for a photo with a group of monks.
  • What Is the Buddha Doing With His Hands? Here Are The Meanings!

    What Is the Buddha Doing With His Hands? Here Are The Meanings!

  • What Happens When We Die? Here's What Buddhism Says!

    What Happens When We Die? Here's What Buddhism Says!

    The Buddha’s teachings offers the most satisfactory explanation of where man came from and where he is going. When we die, the mind, with all the tendencies, preferences, abilities and characteristics that have been developed and conditioned in this life, re-establishes itself in a new being. Thus the new individual grows and develops a personality conditioned both by the mental characteristics that have been carried over from the previous life and by the new environment. The personality will change and be modified by conscious effort and conditioning factors like education, parental influence and society but once again at death, it will re-establish itself as life in a new being. This process of dying and being reborn will continue until the conditions that cause it, the mental factors of craving and ignorance, cease. When they do, instead of being reborn, the mind attains a state called Nirvana.
  • K.J. Somaiya College, Mumbai, Launches Course on Buddhism for Engineering Students

    K.J. Somaiya College, Mumbai, Launches Course on Buddhism for Engineering Students

    Engineering students at K.J. Somaiya College of Engineering (KJSCE) in Mumbai, India, have joined a first-of-its-kind course on Buddhism titled, “Buddhism for Engineers.” Twenty students are reported to have enrolled in the audit course, which introduces the life and teachings of the Buddha and his analysis of the human mind. The purpose of the course is to examine the Buddhist theory of causality, which explains that every phenomenon comes into being because of intricate causes and conditions, and when these conditions break apart, things fall apart, which is a theory of interconnectedness that the college believes could enhance the students’ understanding of engineering.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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