• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • Britain’s Prince Harry Reportedly Tells Buddhist Monk About Daily Meditation Practice

    Britain’s Prince Harry Reportedly Tells Buddhist Monk About Daily Meditation Practice

    Meeting wellwishers during a royal visit to Birkenhead in Merseyside, England, on 14 January, Britain’s Prince Harry reportedly shared with 69-year-old Buddhist monk Kelsang Sonam that he meditates every day. Following their conversation, Kelsang Sonam presented the prince a copy of the book Eight Steps to Happiness: The Buddhist Way of Loving Kindness by the Tibetan Dharma teacher Kelsang Gyatso.
  • The Union of Buddhist Thought and Human Health

    The Union of Buddhist Thought and Human Health

    In many Buddhist texts, both within the Tripitaka and elsewhere, are complex scientific discussions about the relationship between body parts and the mind or thought; processes such blood circulation, digestion and the digestive tract, and medical treatments. The Mahavagga of the Vinaya Pitaka of the Pali Canon offers a detailed description of the treatment of physical diseases. The book is divided into ten chapters or sections. In the sixth chapter, the Buddha is said to have described different diseases and methods and medicines used to cure Buddhists of health problems.
  • Bodhisattva Quan Am’s Blessings, the Aesthetics of Devotion in a Vietnamese Temple in Maine

    Bodhisattva Quan Am’s Blessings, the Aesthetics of Devotion in a Vietnamese Temple in Maine

    Walking up to Hoi Duc Temple in Portland, Maine, the first thing one notices is the aroma of incense. Approaching the modest corner building located in a peaceful residential area, one is greeted with a shining image of Quan Am (Guanyin, Avalokiteshvara), the Bodhisattva of Infinite Compassion, whose welcoming gaze casts benevolence onto this snowy street of South Portland. The incense offered at her feet serves as a portal into this abode of refuge and beauty.
  • Buddha Head Found amid New Excavation Efforts in Gujarat, India

    Buddha Head Found amid New Excavation Efforts in Gujarat, India

    Archaeologists have unearthed a carved Buddha head at a Ramdev Pir temple—a temple dedicated to a the local Hindu folk deity Baba Ramdev—at Negardi Village near Taranga in the Indian state Gujarat. According to the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the find will further consolidate the work of Excavation Branch V of the ASI, which has expanded the search and excavation of Buddhist-related sites to include northern Gujarat.
  • Environmental Expert Warns that Buddhist Practice of Life Release Could Spark Ecological Crisis

    Environmental Expert Warns that Buddhist Practice of Life Release Could Spark Ecological Crisis

    An environmental expert in New Zealand has cautioned Buddhists against practicing life release—the act of saving the life of an animal by returning it to the wild—warning that unmindfully releasing animals into environments to which they are not native can be deadly for the animals being freed and in some cases can wreak havoc on delicate ecosystems.
  • What is Happening?

    What is Happening?

    American singer-songwriter and Noble laureate Bob Dylan wrote in his song Ballad of a Thin Man: Because something is happening here But you don’t know what it is Do you, Mister Jones?
  • Inner Immensity at the Great Assembly

    Inner Immensity at the Great Assembly

    I have my favorites when it comes to Buddhist writing (who doesn’t?)—there are texts that speak to me and others that don’t. Some sources are clear and straightforward, while others are . . . well, not so straightforward. Some Buddhist texts are so convoluted and flamboyant, it’s like rummaging through a crowded attic looking for hidden treasure.
  • Buddhistdoor View: Buddhism in Southeast Asia: a Catalyst for Civic Exchange

    Buddhistdoor View: Buddhism in Southeast Asia: a Catalyst for Civic Exchange

    On 13 November, Buddhist leaders from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia met in Vientiane, the capital of Laos,to “strengthen co-operation between the three countries’ Buddhist organizations and promote and develop Lao Buddhism [both] in the region and internationally.” This meeting, attended by over 500 monastics, was called “The 1st Cambodia-Laos-Vietnam Buddhist Leaders' Conference.” (Việt Nam News) 
  • Shah Allah Ditta Buddhist Caves in Pakistan in Need of Preservation

    Shah Allah Ditta Buddhist Caves in Pakistan in Need of Preservation

    Though overshadowed by other, more prominent Buddhist sites in Pakistan, the 2,500-year-old Buddhist caves of Shah Allah Ditta village attract hundreds of visitors each weekend. The caves themselves and the amenities surrounding them, however, appear to have been neglected by the authorities, and plans for the regulation, conservation, and development of the site have yet to be put into action.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Filling the Emptiness with Love at the Duc Son Orphanage
The open fields of Thuy Bang village offer a refreshing change from the busy traffic and the crowds of tourists one can find just 7 kilometres north of the village in the city of Hue in Central Vietnam. Up a little side road lined with huge shady trees you can find the Duc Son Pagoda. Inside the compound stands a sprawling Bodhi tree, which provides shade and a cool place for a break in the summer heat. It was at the foot of this tree that head nun Thich Nu Minh Tu found baby Tranh, wrapped in a blanket, cold and hungry. Barely two weeks old, the chances of baby Tranh surviving were low. But Thich Nu Minh Tu did not give up. Today, the sight of Thanh sleeping soundly in her crib warms the heart. Nursed by the nuns’ tender care and love, Thanh is now a healthy 3 month old baby.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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