• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • Buddhist Path Beyond Borders

    Buddhist Path Beyond Borders

    India is the motherland of Buddhism and a great source of knowledge and wisdom. In August, I had the honor of teaching a series of lectures on Buddhism in India. I was invited by the Centre for Indology at the Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan—an internationally reputed institution dedicated to the promotion of education and culture, founded in 1938 by the Indian politician, writer, and educationist Dr. Kanhaiyalal Maniklal Munshi (1887–1971). My lecture series on Buddhism in Tibet, Mongolia, Russia, and Bulgaria was organized by the dean of the Center of Indology, Prof. Dr. Shashi Bala, with the support of the director of Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan,  Ashok Pradhan.
  • Two Buddhist Temples in Hong Kong Designated as National Monuments

    Two Buddhist Temples in Hong Kong Designated as National Monuments

    The Antiquities Advisory Board (AAB) of Hong Kong has designated two Buddhist temples—Tung Lin Kok Yuen (TLKY) Temple on Hong Kong Island and Yeung Hau Temple on Lantau Island—as monuments under the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance, along with a Christian landmark—Kowloon Union Church.
  • Ancient Buddhist Scriptures Found Inside Amitabha Statue in South Korea

    Ancient Buddhist Scriptures Found Inside Amitabha Statue in South Korea

    The Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism announced on Monday that 29 Buddhist manuscripts have been discovered inside a 15th century wooden statue of a seated Amitabha Buddha. The statue was part of the collection of Haein Temple in South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.
  • What it Means to be a Buddhist

    What it Means to be a Buddhist

    As citizens of Earth, we have layers of identity that make us unique from those around us as well as affiliating us with certain groups. Religion usually plays an important role in forging our personal identity. In developed countries, you don’t necessarily have to subscribe to a particular organized religion, although the same is not true in countries where theocratic governments demand that their citizens pledge allegiance to a particular faith. Moreover, the law in these societies doesn’t permit people to convert from one religion to another—such governments often have a declared state religion that allows adherents from other traditions to join, but not the other way around.
  • Buddhism the Fastest-growing Religion in Scottish and English Prisons

    Buddhism the Fastest-growing Religion in Scottish and English Prisons

    For the past three years, Buddhism has been the fastest-growing religion among prisoners in Scottish prisons. Data recently obtained via a Freedom of Information request, shows that 22 prisoners registered their religion as Buddhism in the past three years.
  • Sri Lankan Prime Minister Reaffirms Buddhism as “First Among Equals” in Country’s Constitution

    Sri Lankan Prime Minister Reaffirms Buddhism as “First Among Equals” in Country’s Constitution

    Buddhism should be considered the “foremost” religion alongside a guarantee of equal rights for all faith traditions, prime minister Ranil Wickremesinghe said in an address last week. He was speaking at the opening ceremony of the Association of SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) Speakers and Parliamentarians in Colombo on 4 October. 
  • The Daily Practice of a Modern Chinese Buddhist Nun: Facing the Discomfort

    The Daily Practice of a Modern Chinese Buddhist Nun: Facing the Discomfort

    The first challenge I encountered during the first year of my monastic training as a postulant was overcoming the discomfort from the clothes we wore. We had a special uniform—a long-sleeved, loose grey midi robe with long pants. In the winter, we could put on more layers inside and a black coat while outside. But in the hot summer, even when it was over 35ºC (about 95ºF, but it felt like 100ºF due to the humidity), we still needed to wear our uniform day and night without air conditioning. This was really too much for me, especially after I had become so used to the comfortable weather in the Westwood/Santa Monica area of California. We were sweating all the time—it felt like our bodies were soaking in salty water. It was even worse during morning/evening services and chanting ceremonies because we were required to wear another black maxi robe with long sleeves. I could not imagine how I would tolerate the habit after ordination, which has the additional layer of a long-sleeved maxi robe and long grey tube socks. Because of this, I also felt sympathy for Roman Catholic nuns!
  • The Five Mental Hindrances

    The Five Mental Hindrances

    The Five Mental Hindrances are: 1. Sensual desire 2. Ill will 3. Sloth and torpor 4. Restlessness and remorse 5. Skeptical doubt
  • Buddhist Nun Runs Meditation Sessions at Cairns Hospital in Australia

    Buddhist Nun Runs Meditation Sessions at Cairns Hospital in Australia

    Venerable Rinchen, nun and coordinator of the Khacho Yulo Ling Buddhist Centre (KYLBC) in the city of Cairns in the northeastern Australian staste of Queensland, provides meditation sessions at Cairns Hospital as part of a cardiac rehabilitation program and the heart conditioning clinic.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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