• Buddhist economics for Nepal

    Buddhist economics for Nepal

    Following the Buddhist concept of right livelihood can help maximise wellbeing for Nepal Kathmandu, Nepal  -- Right livelihood’ is one of the Buddha’s noble eightfold paths. But what does that mean for a Nepali, and how can we develop it? The ongoing changes within and around us, our attempts to draft a new constitution, and our neighbours’ push towards greater economic reforms, could change Nepali society in unprecedented ways and redefine what right livelihood can be.
  • Small grants for Triratna projects and Centres: the Growth Fund 2014

    Small grants for Triratna projects and Centres: the Growth Fund 2014

    Every year, Triratna’s European Chairs’ Assembly (ECA) awards a number of small grants from its Growth Fund. This year five grants were made, to a total of GBP 3,575. Your Centre, group or project may like to consider applying next year.
  • Oldest Buddhist Manuscripts Damaged in Kashmir Floods

    Oldest Buddhist Manuscripts Damaged in Kashmir Floods

    Kashmir, Pakistan  -- An operation to restore priceless manuscripts, antiques and artefacts damaged in the recent Jammu and Kashmir floods has begun in India.
  • 7 Reasons You Should NEVER Skip Breakfast

    7 Reasons You Should NEVER Skip Breakfast

    Do you eat breakfast regularly? Many people find that they are often too busy in the morning to have breakfast. Some just say that they aren’t hungry enough when they wake up to want to eat anything substantial. Those who don’t eat breakfast could potentially be doing more harm to their bodies than good. Studies show that there are several important reasons to eat breakfast every single morning, no mater how busy you are and even if you aren’t very hungry. Listed below are 7 reasons to eat breakfast every morning and why it is so vital.
  • Winners of 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Announced

    Winners of 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Announced

    On 19 September, the Center for Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, announced this year’s winners of the Toshihide Numata Book Prize: Erik Braun, professor of Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma, and John K. Nelson, professor of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Francisco. With a value of US$10,000, the Toshihide Numata Book Prize is awarded annually to writers of outstanding books in English on any area of Buddhist Studies.
  • His Holiness the Dalai Lama Congratulates Malala Yousafzai & Kailash Satyarthi

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama Congratulates Malala Yousafzai & Kailash Satyarthi

    Dharamsala, HP, India,10 October 2014 - Immediately on receiving news of the announcement of this year’s Nobel Prize winners, His Holiness wrote to both of the laureates.
  • New Dharma School in Oregon Opens its Doors

    New Dharma School in Oregon Opens its Doors

    A non-profit private school in Eugene, Oregon, has taken an innovative step in educating the city’s young minds. Saraha Children's School is incorporating traditional Buddhist methods and studies into its academic curriculum. Shambhala Sun's news site reports that the school not only introduces students to meditation, but that the classroom ties in “language and practices of compassion, wisdom, and peace.”
  • Tibetan Buddhists Build Garden for Peace in Montana

    Tibetan Buddhists Build Garden for Peace in Montana

    The Tibetan Buddhist center Ewam Sang-ngag Ling (EWAM) in Arlee, Montana, is building a garden for peace called the Garden of One Thousand Buddhas. Located on the Flathead Indian Reservation belonging to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, EWAM was established in 1993 under the spiritual guidance of its founder, Gochen Tulku Sang-Ngag Rinpoche, a high-ranking lama from the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism.
  • His Holiness the Dalai Lama is Offered a Long-life Ceremony

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama is Offered a Long-life Ceremony

    Thekchen Chöling, Dharamsala, India, 8 October 2014 - Today, the 15th of the 8th Tibetan month, the propitious full-moon day, a Long-life Ceremony was offered to His Holiness the Dalai Lama. It began early in the morning prior to the third day of his explanation of Nagarjuna’s ‘Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way’. The ceremony, which was based on a vision of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo focussing on a triad of longevity deities, White Tara crowned by Amitayus, who in turn is crowned by Ushnisha Vijaya, was conducted by monks of Namgyal Monastery led by their Abbot, Thamtog Rinpoche.
  • Anapana Meditation Initiative for Schoolchildren in Maharashtra

    Anapana Meditation Initiative for Schoolchildren in Maharashtra

    The state government of Maharashtra in India has initiated a new project, “Mitra Upakram” (Mitra stands for Mind in Training for Right Awareness, and mitra also means “friend” in Marathi and Hindi), which offers Anapana meditation courses to 25 million primary- and secondary-schoolchildren. It is hoped that this new scheme will reduce stress and help students to develop calmness and practice non-violence.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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