• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • Japanese Archeologists Unearth Foundations of Ancient Second Capital in Osaka Prefecture

    Japanese Archeologists Unearth Foundations of Ancient Second Capital in Osaka Prefecture

    Researchers in Japan’s Osaka Prefecture have unearthed new archealogical evidence of ancient structures that they believe point to the existance of a fabled “second” capital city dating to the 8th century. The find at the Higashi-Yuge archaeological site in the city of Yao, comes six months after the discovery of the foundations of an ancient Buddhist temple thought to be Yuge-ji, a temple built by a powerful Buddhist monk named Dōkyō (c. 700–72) in the 8th century. The latest discovery seems to point to the existence of a mysterious second capital known as Yuge-no-miya, supposedly built during the late Nara period (710–84) by the Empress Shōtoku  (r. 764–70).
  • Theravada Buddhism and Teresian Mysticism: A Reflection on Interreligious Dialogue

    Theravada Buddhism and Teresian Mysticism: A Reflection on Interreligious Dialogue

    The “1st World Encounter Teresian Mysticism and Interreligious Dialogue: Theravada Buddhism and Teresian Mysticism – Meditation and Contemplation Pathways to Peace” was held from 27–30 July at the International Centre of Teresian and Sanjuanist Studies (CITeS) of the University of Mysticism in Avila, Spain. The conference was organized with the Centre of Buddhist Studies (CBS) of The University of Hong Kong (HKU). Venerable Dr. Amrita Nanda and I participated in this conference to lead the Buddhist chanting ceremony conducted every morning after the Christian mass. It was, for me, a true experience in interfaith friendship and mutual respect.  
  • Researchers Measure Brain Activity of Monks During Monastic Debate

    Researchers Measure Brain Activity of Monks During Monastic Debate

    A group of researchers from the Science for Monks project and Kent State University have been measuring the brain activity of Buddhist monks engaged in monastic debates. The research, which took place from 29 July–12 August at Sera Jey Monastic University in Bylakuppe, India, used electroencephalograph (EEG) technology to measure neural oscillation in the brain as the monks engaged in serious debates on topics ranging from emptiness to cosmology.
  • The Daily Practice of a Modern Chinese Buddhist Nun: Meeting Master Sheng-Yen and Taking the Bodhisattva Vows

    The Daily Practice of a Modern Chinese Buddhist Nun: Meeting Master Sheng-Yen and Taking the Bodhisattva Vows

    I was introduced to the Chan Meditation Center in New York in 1997, when I came to work as a volunteer for almost a month. I arrived in the late afternoon just before the evening service had ended. When the door opened, I saw Master Sheng Yen (later, I called him shifu) walk into the reception area. We met each other face to face and he seemed to know that I was coming. I put down my luggage and stood before him. Without knowing any Buddhist etiquette, I simply nodded my head with smile, no prostration or bow, nor even joined palms. He looked at me kindly and told me in an encouraging tone, “You need to develop a good affinity with more people.” He then invited me to join them for supper.
  • 12th Century Medicine Buddha and Guardian Deity Unearthed at Angkor Archaeological Park

    12th Century Medicine Buddha and Guardian Deity Unearthed at Angkor Archaeological Park

    A team of archaeologists excavating an 800-year-old site in Cambodia’s famed Angkor Archaeological Park have unearthed fragments of a rare Medicine Buddha carving and a two-meter-tall guardian statue that they believe date back to the 12th century. The Cambodia Daily newspaper described the unexpected discoveries as "like something that only happens in the movies.” 
  • Perception and Reaction – Embracing Hard Truths

    Perception and Reaction – Embracing Hard Truths

    It’s often interesting to watch one’s own ego in action. I recently had a discussion with a couple of friends on life’s purpose and the value we place on the things we hope to accomplish.
  • Interfaith Dialogue for Peace, Harmony, and Security Held in Myanmar

    Interfaith Dialogue for Peace, Harmony, and Security Held in Myanmar

    From 5–6 August, 135 religious leaders and diplomats from 32 countries gathered at Sitagu International Buddhist Academy (SIBA) in Yangon, Myanmar, for an interfaith dialogue to promote global peace, harmony, and security. Notable participants included government officials such as Thura U Aung Ko, Myanmar’s union minister for religious affairs and culture, Ramachandra Damodar Naik, governor of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, Yogi Adityanath, chief minister of Uttar Pradesh, and Nobuo Kishi, Japanese state minster for foreign affairs.
  • Contemplation of Feelings

    Contemplation of Feelings

    Venerable Nyanatiloka Mahathera cites the Word of the Buddha on the contemplation of feelings (Diga Nikaya 22): But how does the disciple dwell in contemplation of the feelings? In experiencing feelings, the disciple knows: “I have an agreeable feeling;” or: "I have a disagreeable feeling,” or: "I have an indifferent feeling;” or: “I have a worldly agreeable feeling,” or: “I have an unworldly agreeable feeling,” or: “I have a worldly disagreeable feeling,” or: “I have an unworldly disagreeable feeling,” or: “I have a worldly indifferent feeling,” or: “I have an unworldly indifferent feeling.”
  • Dalai Lama Turns Spotlight on Fallibility of Buddhist Teachers in Public Address

    Dalai Lama Turns Spotlight on Fallibility of Buddhist Teachers in Public Address

    A recent public address by His Holiness the Dalai Lama contained a firmly worded note of caution for Dharma students against ignoring the personal failings of lamas and Buddhist teachers. The Dalai Lama urged students not to be afraid to publicize misconduct or ethical lapses by their gurus, nor to indiscriminately accept teachings without subjecting them to critical analysis.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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