• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • Fire Breaks Out in Tibet’s 1,300-year-old Jokhang Temple; Extent of Damage Uncertain

    Fire Breaks Out in Tibet’s 1,300-year-old Jokhang Temple; Extent of Damage Uncertain

    A large fire broke out on Saturday evening in the compound of one of Tibetan Buddhism’s most sacred temples, the Jokhang in Lhasa. Footage posted to social media showed a blaze engulfing a building within the temple compound, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, at around 6:30pm local time. Although the area is typically crowded with pilgrims, especially during the Losar celebration of the traditional Lunar New Year, which began on Friday, no casualties have been reported.
  • First Amaravati Buddhist Heritage Festival Sets World Record for Global Peace Chant

    First Amaravati Buddhist Heritage Festival Sets World Record for Global Peace Chant

    The first Amaravati Buddhist Heritage Festival was held in the southeastern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh on 3–5 February, The opening ceremony began with a collective chant for world peace and harmony by more than a 1,000 monks representing the Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana schools, with more than 45,000 people from around the world participating via the Internet, setting a world record for the largest global chant.
  • New 45-foot Buddha Statue in Bangladesh a Symbol of Communal Harmony

    New 45-foot Buddha Statue in Bangladesh a Symbol of Communal Harmony

    A new 45-foot statue of the Buddha erected in Bangladesh’s Chittagong Hill Tracts on the premises of Tainkhalipara Sanghamitva Seva Sangha Vihar (TSSSV) has become a symbol of communal unity in a region too often affected by conflict and unrest.
  • Book Review: Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment

    Book Review: Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment

    Mindfulness meditation has earned a big following in the West in recent years, thanks in large part to its therapeutic benefits. It is no surprise, therefore, that Robert Wright, a best-selling science journalist, would be drawn to this fascinating and occasionally contentious subject.
  • Courage and Compassion: Johanne Lauktien and Remedial Yoga for Cancer Patients

    Courage and Compassion: Johanne Lauktien and Remedial Yoga for Cancer Patients

    “I’m not a cancer survivor,” is one of the first things Johanne Lauktien feels compelled to tell me, because she teaches remedial yoga for cancer patients and survivors. This often emotionally challenging career has been her calling for the past few years, during which she went on a multifaceted spiritual journey and emerged a changed person. Her Instagram account, as well as her Facebook page, reveal a holistic health instructor passionate about engaging with life fully.
  • Creating a Compassionate Civilization: An Interview with Robertson Work

    Creating a Compassionate Civilization: An Interview with Robertson Work

    It’s clear to most of us these days that compassion is a much-needed quality in the world. But what actually is it? And how can we help it grow and develop around us? In recent decades in North America, a growing number of Buddhists have recognized the need to bring Buddhism “off the cushion” and out into the world. For many, this call has been inspired by the Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh, and for some by the pioneering efforts of the Indian reformer Dr. B. R. Ambedkar. But for others, there is simply a direct realization that their values of compassion and wisdom mean little if they do not translate into action.
  • Taiwan Launches New Initiative to Promote Green Funerals

    Taiwan Launches New Initiative to Promote Green Funerals

    HONG KONG—The Civil Affairs Bureau of Taichung City in western Taiwan has launched a “Card of a Fulfilled Life” as part of an initiative to promote environmentally friendly funerals and to encourage funeral autonomy—enabling people to express funerary preferences that may differ from traditional expectations.
  • Greens and Garlic Frittata to Go

    Greens and Garlic Frittata to Go

    Chop the greens super-fine to achieve the prettiest color. Use whatever looks best in the market (spinach and chard are brightest when it comes to color), or you can use bagged baby spinach. You only need 1/2 cup of chopped greens, but you could use twice that amount.
  • Glazed Shiitakes With Bok Choy

    Glazed Shiitakes With Bok Choy

    Gorgeous glazed shiitake mushrooms and tender green bok choy sparked with ginger, sesame and hot pepper work beautifully against more staid flavors, so consider serving them next to a traditional roast chicken or turkey. They also are delicious draped over a pile of rice.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Filling the Emptiness with Love at the Duc Son Orphanage
The open fields of Thuy Bang village offer a refreshing change from the busy traffic and the crowds of tourists one can find just 7 kilometres north of the village in the city of Hue in Central Vietnam. Up a little side road lined with huge shady trees you can find the Duc Son Pagoda. Inside the compound stands a sprawling Bodhi tree, which provides shade and a cool place for a break in the summer heat. It was at the foot of this tree that head nun Thich Nu Minh Tu found baby Tranh, wrapped in a blanket, cold and hungry. Barely two weeks old, the chances of baby Tranh surviving were low. But Thich Nu Minh Tu did not give up. Today, the sight of Thanh sleeping soundly in her crib warms the heart. Nursed by the nuns’ tender care and love, Thanh is now a healthy 3 month old baby.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
» Audio
» Photo gallery
» Buddhism Dictionary
» Lunar calendar