• His Holiness the Dalai Lama Meets Indians, Chinese and Sotoshu Monks in Tokyo

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama Meets Indians, Chinese and Sotoshu Monks in Tokyo

    Tokyo, Japan, 16 April 2014 - Having arrived in Tokyo yesterday evening, His Holiness the Dalai Lama had meetings with several quite different groups of people today. The first was a group of business people from India. He began by telling them how he praises India all over the world for its religious harmony, the way different faiths, some originating in India and others coming from abroad live peacefully side by side. He suggested Indian communities overseas should make more of this wherever they are. In the 21st century, the secular approach exemplified by India is increasingly relevant all over the world.
  • Public Talk in Koyasan before Departure for Tokyo

    Public Talk in Koyasan before Departure for Tokyo

    Koyasan, Japan, 15 April 2014 - Once more Koyasan was bathed in bright sunshine as His Holiness the Dalai Lama paid a visit to the Daito Stupa. It stands in the Danjo Garan, an area of Koyasan established by Kobo Daishi for training in the practice of esoteric Buddhism. He visited one of the adjacent halls which contain colossal statues related to Vairochana and admired paintings of Kobo Daishi and Nagarjuna high on the walls.
  • Remembering a Hero of Buddhist Politics: The B.R. Ambedkar University of Lucknow Hosts Seminar on Ambedkar’s Thought

    Remembering a Hero of Buddhist Politics: The B.R. Ambedkar University of Lucknow Hosts Seminar on Ambedkar’s Thought

    Second only to Gandhi and Nehru in Indian postcolonial consciousness is the political giant of Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar. Such has been his influence that entire universities were founded in his name, such as the B.R. Ambedkar University of Lucknow, a Central University of India. From 14 – 15 April 2014, the University’s School for Ambedkar Studies is organizing a two-day International Seminar on “Understanding Dr. Ambedkar’s Concept of Dhamma: Transforming Self and Society”.
  • Vairochana-abhisambodhi Empowerment in Koyasan

    Vairochana-abhisambodhi Empowerment in Koyasan

    Koyasan, Japan, 14 April 2014 - In contrast to yesterday, the weather this morning was bright as His Holiness the Dalai Lama walked to the Koyasan University Auditorium. He was to undertake the preparatory rituals for the Vairochana-abhisambodhi empowerment he was going to give.
  • Buddhist college to admit nuns for the first time

    Buddhist college to admit nuns for the first time

    SINGAPORE - Singapore's first campus for Buddhist nuns is set to open its doors to students from across the region in September.
  • Pilgrimage to Koyasan, Headquarters of the Shingon Tradition of Japanese Buddhism

    Pilgrimage to Koyasan, Headquarters of the Shingon Tradition of Japanese Buddhism

    Koyasan, Japan, 13 April 2014 - Skies were grey and there was a chill in the air this morning as His Holiness the Dalai Lama left Kyoto to drive to Koyasan. The Koyasan mountains south of Osaka are the headquarters of the Shingon sect of Japanese Buddhism, sometimes referred to as Esoteric Buddhism, an epithet for the path of secret mantra. This is what Kobo Daishi, founder of the Shingon tradition, learned and brought back to Japan after travelling to China in the early ninth century CE. One of his motives for making the journey was to learn Sanskrit to better understand Buddhist scriptures and it seems that one of his early teachers was an Indian Pandit called Prajna who had studied at Nalanda. Kobo Daishi founded the Kongobuji Temple at Koyasan in 816 and passed away in 835 at the age of 62. His Holiness has been invited to teach and grant the Mahakarunagarbhodbhava Mandala Initiation.
  • Mapping the Mind - Day 2

    Mapping the Mind - Day 2

    Kyoto, Japan, 12 April 2014 - The second day of the Mapping the Mind meeting began in a quiet business like way. Presentations began as soon as His Holiness had quietly taken his seat on the stage. Shinobu Kitayama, born in Japan, but now Professor of Psychology in Michigan, began, speaking about Cultural Neuroscience, with the observation that cultural context is important for understanding the human mind.
  • Mapping the Mind - Day 1

    Mapping the Mind - Day 1

    Kyoto, Japan, 11 April 2014 - A two day dialogue between scientists and contemplative scholars and practitioners focussed on the theme ‘Mapping the Mind’ in Japan’s erstwhile capital, Kyoto, began promptly today. Arthur Zajonc, President of the Mind & Life Institute and Sakiko Yoshikawa, Director of the Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University were brisk in their introductory remarks. They invited His Holiness the Dalai Lama to open the proceedings, which he did.
  • His Holiness the Dalai Lama Visits a School, Buddhist Centre and Temple in Osaka

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama Visits a School, Buddhist Centre and Temple in Osaka

    Osaka, Japan, 9 April 2014 - His Holiness the Dalai Lama began his day in Osaka with a visit to the Seifu Gakuen Boys School. More than 2000 Middle and High School students assembled on the school ground applauded his arrival. As he took his place on the dais, they launched into a spirited recitation of the Heart Sutra, at the end of which he began his talk.
  • Informal Interaction with Shinto Followers

    Informal Interaction with Shinto Followers

    Sendai, Japan, 8 April 2014 - After the formal air of yesterday’s purification prayers and His Holiness’s public talk, today there was an opportunity for easier interaction between him and Shinto followers from many walks of life. After brief introductory speeches an elderly man offered His Holiness a framed calligraphy of the Japanese character for ‘peace’ along with a flyer he said he has been distributing to promote peace in the world.
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Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
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Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text.The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature.According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10]The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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