• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • My Story: Walking the Path of a Female Monastic in Bhutan

    My Story: Walking the Path of a Female Monastic in Bhutan

    I am a humble Buddhist nun from Bhutan. As a young girl, it was my dream to become a nun and I am happy that my strong past karma took me to the place I wished to be and allowed me to realize this dream. I grew up as the only girl among five siblings and, at the age of 14, I left home to become a nun. Fortunately, my family supported my dream and they have continued to do so to the present day.
  • Buddhist “Eco-monks” Work to Protect Thailand’s Environment

    Buddhist “Eco-monks” Work to Protect Thailand’s Environment

    As Thailand’s economy develops and grows, maintaining the delicate ecological balance remains a major challenge. As a consequence of extensive deforestation and widespread dam projects, the country is regularly affected by both flooding and droughts, but some Buddhist monks are actively working to protect the environment by integrating Buddhist principals with environmental awareness, consulting with government officials about environmental problems, and implementing sustainability projects, such as installing solar panels at Buddhist temples and helping villagers fashion environmentally friendly cottages out of mud and other naturally available materials. 
  • Thai Cave Boys Complete Nine Day Ordination as Novice Monks

    Thai Cave Boys Complete Nine Day Ordination as Novice Monks

    Eleven members of the Wild Boars soccer team, who were rescued from a flooded cave in northern Thailand after being trapped for 18 days, completed their temporary ordination as novice monks at Pha That Doi Wao Temple in northern Thailand on Saturday. Their coach, Ekapol “Ek” Chanthawong, will remain at the monastery for three months, having undertaken full monastic vows for the duration of the Buddhist rains retreat.
  • Repurposed Japanese Temple Candles Provide Light for Underprivileged Children

    Repurposed Japanese Temple Candles Provide Light for Underprivileged Children

    Hundreds of Buddhist temples in Japan are donating used ceremonial candles to provide much needed sources of light for underprivileged children across the world. In June alone some 7,800 partially used candles still with hours of use in them were packed into cardboard boxes and loaded on board a ship in Yokohama port to begin a three-month journey over sea and land to children in need in Afghanistan.
  • Zanskar Buddhists and Muslims Pledge Peace Before the Dalai Lama

    Zanskar Buddhists and Muslims Pledge Peace Before the Dalai Lama

    Representatives of the Buddhist and Muslim communities in Zanskar in the far northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir recently signed a pledge of peace and religious harmony in the presence of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, vowing to bring an end to communal tensions that have plagued communities in the mountainous region for decades. His holiness described the landark step toward resolving the longstanding conflict during his visit to the Himalayan region as a major achievement.
  • The Head of Korea’s Largest Buddhist Order Apologizes for Corruption Furor

    The Head of Korea’s Largest Buddhist Order Apologizes for Corruption Furor

    The presiding executive of the Jogye Order of South Korea has issued a public apology for the series of scandals that has enveloped the order and his leadership of the organization. Venerable Seoljeong, who heads South Korea’s largest Buddhist order, stated that he would not step down from his position immediately, however, insisting that the allegations against him are untrue.
  • High Court Orders Bodh Gaya a Plastic-free Zone, Demands Government Action against Plastic Pollution

    High Court Orders Bodh Gaya a Plastic-free Zone, Demands Government Action against Plastic Pollution

    On 23 July, Patna High Court, the high court of the Indian state of Bihar, has instructed the Gaya District administration to announce Bodh Gaya a plastic-free zone and ordered Bihar State government to take action against the pollution caused by polythene bags, after local news reports revealed the level of plastic pollution in Muchalinda Lake. 
  • Rock Star Buddhist Nun Ani Choying Drolma Donates US$90,000 to Fund Bridge Construction in Nepal

    Rock Star Buddhist Nun Ani Choying Drolma Donates US$90,000 to Fund Bridge Construction in Nepal

    Ani Choying Drolma, sometimes dubbed Nepal’s rock star nun in the media as a result of her successful career singing Buddhist chants and songs, has donated 10 million Nepalese rupees (more than US$90,000) to the government of Nepal to help fund the construction of suspension bridges in remote parts of the Himalayan nation that are currently only accessible by dangerous pulley crossings.
  • Bhutan, the World’s Only Carbon-negative Nation, Sets an Example of Environmental Stewardship for a Planet Grappling with Climate Change

    Bhutan, the World’s Only Carbon-negative Nation, Sets an Example of Environmental Stewardship for a Planet Grappling with Climate Change

    While the world scrambles to offset the increasingly extreme effects of anthropogenic climate change on weather patterns, food production, ecosystems, and animal populations, the Buddhist Kingdom of Bhutan last year became the first and only carbon-negative country on the planet. A living example and model that there are better, more workable approaches to economic development and sustainability, Bhutan did something every country has the power to do: it stopped destroying its environment and started protecting it.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Filling the Emptiness with Love at the Duc Son Orphanage
The open fields of Thuy Bang village offer a refreshing change from the busy traffic and the crowds of tourists one can find just 7 kilometres north of the village in the city of Hue in Central Vietnam. Up a little side road lined with huge shady trees you can find the Duc Son Pagoda. Inside the compound stands a sprawling Bodhi tree, which provides shade and a cool place for a break in the summer heat. It was at the foot of this tree that head nun Thich Nu Minh Tu found baby Tranh, wrapped in a blanket, cold and hungry. Barely two weeks old, the chances of baby Tranh surviving were low. But Thich Nu Minh Tu did not give up. Today, the sight of Thanh sleeping soundly in her crib warms the heart. Nursed by the nuns’ tender care and love, Thanh is now a healthy 3 month old baby.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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