• Thich Nhat Hanh Recovers from Brain Hemorrhage and Returns to Plum Village

    Thich Nhat Hanh Recovers from Brain Hemorrhage and Returns to Plum Village

    Following a brain hemorrhage last November, Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh (known to his followers as Thay) was finally able to return home to Plum Village in Dordogne, southern France, on 3 April. He was greeted by blooming magnolia flowers, loving students, and a team of doctors who will continue to help him to recover.
  • Sri Lanka Mourns the Passing of Ven. Udugama Sri Buddharakkhita Rathanapala Mahanayaka Thera

    Sri Lanka Mourns the Passing of Ven. Udugama Sri Buddharakkhita Rathanapala Mahanayaka Thera

    The Chief Prelate of the Asgiriya Chapter of the Siamese Sect* in Sri Lanka, Ven. Aggamaha Panditha Udugama Sri Buddharakkhita Rathanapala Mahanayaka Thera (Ven. Sri Buddharakkhita Mahanayaka Thera for short), passed away at the age of 85 on 8 April while undergoing treatment at Mount Elizabeth Hospital in Singapore. The late Mahanayaka Thera was receiving medical treatment in Kandy General Hospital in Sri Lanka before he was flown to Singapore at the end of March.
  • New Art Exhibition about Avalokiteshvara to be held in New York

    New Art Exhibition about Avalokiteshvara to be held in New York

    An exhibition on the art of Avalokiteshvara, the Buddhist embodiment of compassion, will be held from 23 April until 28 June at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College in New York. The exhibit is titled, “Embodying Compassion in Buddhist Art: Image, Pilgrimage, Practice.” The exhibition is divided into three thematic sections, including image, pilgrimage, and practice. This is the first comprehensive artistic exploration of this supremely important Buddhist divinity in the United States.  
  • UN Vesak Friendship Dinner in Melbourne

    UN Vesak Friendship Dinner in Melbourne

    The Victorian Observance of the United Nations Day of Vesak organising committee held their annual friendship dinner at Melbourne's Quang Minh Temple Community Hall on Saturday, 4 April. With over six hundred enthusiastic Buddhists from a range of traditions in attendance, the evening was a great success and everyone had a most enjoyable time. 
  • The Karmapa brings Buddhist Thought to American Universities

    The Karmapa brings Buddhist Thought to American Universities

    His Holiness the 17th Karmapa is continuing his tour of the United States, which includes visits to six universities. He addresses topics such as gender equality, the environment, vegetarianism, and social activism. His first stop was at Stanford, on the west coast. He received his first honorary degree at the University of Redlands on 24 March. He gave a lecture at Harvard on 26 March, and at Princeton on 1 April. He will also visit Yale and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Kim Cang Temple Fundraiser in Victoria, Australia

    Kim Cang Temple Fundraiser in Victoria, Australia

    On Easter Monday (6 April), the Kim Cang Temple held its first fundraiser at the Springvale Town Hall. The funds raised will be used to build a Vietnamese Mahayana-style temple at the temple’s Narre Warren North location (one hour from Melbourne).
  • Don’t Rush Past the Suffering

    Don’t Rush Past the Suffering

    Suffering—we are all familiar with this term, and if we have lived for more than a few short months, we are also familiar with this feeling. The idea of suffering is one of the main principles in Buddhist philosophy; it is at the core of its truth and path. In the Four Noble Truths, the Buddha taught about suffering and freedom from suffering. Most practitioners know about the Truth of Suffering, yet sadly, want to skip past it. We repeat the familiar mantra of, “Yeah, yeah, yeah, the Four Noble Truths, I’ve got it, give me an initiation or a mantra to use.”
  • Can Pure Land Aspirants be Reborn Using Mixed or Miscellaneous Practices?

    Can Pure Land Aspirants be Reborn Using Mixed or Miscellaneous Practices?

    Having discussed the importance of the exclusive practice of Amitabha-recitation for assured rebirth in Amitabha’s Land of Bliss, we have the question: can Pure Land aspirants be reborn if they undertake mixed or miscellaneous practices? Well, it depends. According to the Commentary on the Contemplation Sutra, Master Shandao identified three different kinds of mixed or miscellaneous practices.
  • University of Arizona opens a Minor focusing on Buddhism

    University of Arizona opens a Minor focusing on Buddhism

    The University of Arizona is opening a Minor program focusing on Buddhism in the fall. The program will cover a range of disciplines to provide students with a deeper understanding of the culture, traditions, and values of Buddhism. The new program will give students the chance to study topics like Asian religions, Indian and Japanese religions, Zen Buddhism, the history of East Asian Buddhism, and Buddhist meditation traditions as well as other historic studies of Buddhism. Students will be able to use this minor to complement UA’s well-known East Asian studies program.
  • Lost Chinese Buddha Statue Rediscovered in Budapest

    Lost Chinese Buddha Statue Rediscovered in Budapest

    A thousand-year-old Buddhist relic, believed to have been stolen from a temple in China in 1995, has been withdrawn from an exhibition at a museum in Budapest.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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