• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • The First in 1,000 Years: An Interview with Venerable Kusuma

    The First in 1,000 Years: An Interview with Venerable Kusuma

    In 1996, Venerable Dr. Kusuma became the first Buddhist nun in 10 centuries to ordain in Sri Lanka. She later established a meditation center, wrote several books, and has given Dharma talks all over the world. An advocate of women’s ordination, Ven. Dr. Kusuma is credited with helping to revive the Theravada monastic tradition for Sri Lankan women.
  • Siddhartha in São Paulo

    Siddhartha in São Paulo

    Prince Siddhartha left the cloistered world of his palace home to wander in search of truth. His father had striven to shield him from the four aspects of suffering (Skt: duhkha), namely, birth, illness, aging, and death, that form the basis of the First Noble Truth of Buddhism. 
  • Swiss City of Bern Inaugurates Buddhist Burial Ground

    Swiss City of Bern Inaugurates Buddhist Burial Ground

    Berne, the de facto capital of Switzerland, earlier this month became the first city in the federal republic to establish a dedicated cemetery for Buddhists. An inauguration ceremony was held on 5 June attended by around 150 lay and monastic Buddhists to consecrate the new burial ground within the city’s Bremgarten cemetery.
  • Guarding the Doors of the Citadel: Dwelling in Awareness

    Guarding the Doors of the Citadel: Dwelling in Awareness

    The disciple dwells in contemplation of the mind-objects, namely of the six “Subjective-Objective Sense-Bases.” He knows the eye and visual objects, ear and sounds, nose and odors, tongue and tastes, body and bodily impressions, mind and mind-objects; and the fetter that arises in dependence on them, he also knows. He knows how the fetter comes to arise, knows how the fetter is overcome, and how the abandoned fetter does not rise again in future. (Nyanatiloka 67, 1967)
  • Women of Buddhism

    Women of Buddhism

    Buddhist women—lay and monastic alike—make up half of the Fourfold Sangha. Naturally, they too should benefit from equal access to all Buddhist institutions, but the painful truth is that this ideal has not always been realized throughout history, and even today women continue to be underrepresented and denied rights and respect.
  • The Body in Buddhism

    The Body in Buddhism

    Our relationship with our body, in general, is unhealthy since our view toward it tends to be not only flawed, but even negative in a way that can be harsh and unkind. Many organized religions have a reputation for being “anti-body.” In his book Walking Words, the Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano (1940–2015) understood this problem clearly and summarized it in a poem that pointed out these unnatural and unhealthy attitudes toward the body that are prevalent in both religious and secular society: The church says: the body is sin. Science says: the body is a machine. Advertising says: the body is business. The body says: I am a fiesta.
  • Vegetarian Diets Gaining Traction in China, Reports Show

    Vegetarian Diets Gaining Traction in China, Reports Show

    With a landmark study published last week by the journal Science presenting compelling evidence that avoiding meat and dairy products is single biggest way individual people can reduce their environmental impact on the planet, recent media reports indicate a corresponding paradigm shift is taking place in China—the world’s largest market for beef, pork, and poultry products—where health- and environmentally aware people are turning to meat-free diets in growing numbers.
  • Book Review—The Light that Shines Through Infinity: Zen and the Energy of Life

    Book Review—The Light that Shines Through Infinity: Zen and the Energy of Life

    There are many reasons why Japanese Buddhism took hold in North America. While it is common to identify trends at the global level—the end of World War Two, the dialogue between American and Japanese writers and artists during the Beat Generation, and so on—we too often overlook the individuals who drove the diffusion of diverse traditions and the conversation between East and West.
  • Buddhist Temples Across Japan Soon to Offer Rented Accommodation for Tourists

    Buddhist Temples Across Japan Soon to Offer Rented Accommodation for Tourists

    With a new law coming into effect later this month, Buddhist Temples across Japan will be able to rent out their spare rooms to tourists, opening up opportunities for temple stays across the country and allowing them to tap into Japan’s tourism boom.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Filling the Emptiness with Love at the Duc Son Orphanage
The open fields of Thuy Bang village offer a refreshing change from the busy traffic and the crowds of tourists one can find just 7 kilometres north of the village in the city of Hue in Central Vietnam. Up a little side road lined with huge shady trees you can find the Duc Son Pagoda. Inside the compound stands a sprawling Bodhi tree, which provides shade and a cool place for a break in the summer heat. It was at the foot of this tree that head nun Thich Nu Minh Tu found baby Tranh, wrapped in a blanket, cold and hungry. Barely two weeks old, the chances of baby Tranh surviving were low. But Thich Nu Minh Tu did not give up. Today, the sight of Thanh sleeping soundly in her crib warms the heart. Nursed by the nuns’ tender care and love, Thanh is now a healthy 3 month old baby.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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