• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • Blind but not Lost

    Blind but not Lost

    The Sun has barely opened its eye on this October morning in Myanmar, but already there’s a buzz of activity at the School for the Needy Blind as the bus pulls up into the compound. With a giggle, 15-year-old Phyo deftly dabs a light shade of pink onto her lips. She is determined to look her best for this special day. Tapping her cane along the way, she finds the steps of the bus and mounts confidently. For Phyo, and many of her excited classmates on board, this is their first International White Cane Day march in Mandalay. 
  • Shah Allah Ditta Buddhist Caves in Pakistan in Need of Preservation

    Shah Allah Ditta Buddhist Caves in Pakistan in Need of Preservation

    Though overshadowed by other, more prominent Buddhist sites in Pakistan, the 2,500-year-old Buddhist caves of Shah Allah Ditta village attract hundreds of visitors each weekend. The caves themselves and the amenities surrounding them, however, appear to have been neglected by the authorities, and plans for the regulation, conservation, and development of the site have yet to be put into action.
  • Zen Master Lin-chi

    Zen Master Lin-chi

    Línjì Yìxuán (臨済義玄; Wade-Giles: Lin-chi I-hsüan; Japanese: Rinzai Gigen) (?–866) was the founder of the Linji school of Chán Buddhism during Tang Dynasty China. Linji was trained by the Chan master Huangbo Xiyun (Huángbò Xīyùn; 黃蘗希運; Huang-Po Hsi-Yun), but enlightened by the reclusive monk Dàyú (大愚). He suddenly realized the emptiness of thoughts, words, and philosophical explanations, and that truth was to be found within the self, in everyday existence. Linji’s teachings encouraged people to have faith that their natural spontaneous mind is the true Buddha-Mind, and to enter simply and wholeheartedly into every activity. When Linji’s students told him they were searching for deliverance from this world, he would ask them, “If you are delivered from this world, where else is there to go?”
  • Japanese Temples Redistribute Donations to Fight Child Poverty

    Japanese Temples Redistribute Donations to Fight Child Poverty

    Roughly one in seven children in Japan—or 2.8 million children—live in relative poverty, according to media reports, making it one of the most serious, albeit tragically hidden, social problems in contemporary Japanese society. While Japan is a modern and wealthy nation, economic distress often goes hand in hand with social isolation, and most instances of child poverty can go unnoticed until a tragic case makes its way into the mainstream media. In one such case, a 28-year-old mother and her three-year-old son died of starvation in Osaka in 2013, shocking the nation and inspiring Buddhist priest Seirou Matsushima to find a way to address the crisis.
  • American Zen Teacher and Activist Bernie Glassman Passes Away at 79

    American Zen Teacher and Activist Bernie Glassman Passes Away at 79

    American Zen Buddhist teacher and social activist Bernie Glassman passed away at his home in Massachusetts early on Sunday morning at the age of 79, the Buddhist order he founded, Zen Peacemakers International, said in a public notice published on Monday. Glassman was reported to be in the company of his spouse and fellow Zen teacher Eve Marko.
  • Dalai Lama Counsels Youth Leaders from Conflict Zones Against Action Founded in Anger

    Dalai Lama Counsels Youth Leaders from Conflict Zones Against Action Founded in Anger

    Hosting a gathering of 28 youth leaders from 14 countries plagued with conflict and war, His Holiness the Dalai Lama on Wednesday counseled the young visitors to his official residence in Dharamsala, northern India, with one of the fundamental understandings of the Buddhist teachings—that even when based on justified reasons or with sincere motivations, actions founded in or motivated by anger only exacerbate and continue the cycle of violence and conflict.
  • Golden Hall at Buddhist Temple in Nara Restored 301 Years After Fiery Destruction

    Golden Hall at Buddhist Temple in Nara Restored 301 Years After Fiery Destruction

    The Central Golden Hall at the historic Buddhist temple Kofuku-ji in the former Japanese capital of Nara, has finally been restored to its former glory 301 years after it was devastated in a fire in 1717. A ceremony to officially celebrate the completion of the restoration was attended by thousands of devotees and well-wishers from 7–11 October.
  • Buddhist Movie Star Chow Yun-fat Vows to Donate Fortune to Charity

    Buddhist Movie Star Chow Yun-fat Vows to Donate Fortune to Charity

    Veteran actor and film star Chow Yun-fat may have achieved global superstardom, but the trappings of that success don’t seem to have gone to his head as the self-professed Buddhist recently revealed that he plans to donate the bulk of his considerable fortune to charity.
  • World’s Largest Buddhist Sutra Calligraphy Moves Visitors

    World’s Largest Buddhist Sutra Calligraphy Moves Visitors

    Over the past year, more than 40,000 people have travelled to Ryoun-ji, a temple in central Japan, to admire the world’s largest calligraphy of the Heart Sutra, rendered by Shōko Kanazawa, a 33-year-old calligrapher with Down Syndrome.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Filling the Emptiness with Love at the Duc Son Orphanage
The open fields of Thuy Bang village offer a refreshing change from the busy traffic and the crowds of tourists one can find just 7 kilometres north of the village in the city of Hue in Central Vietnam. Up a little side road lined with huge shady trees you can find the Duc Son Pagoda. Inside the compound stands a sprawling Bodhi tree, which provides shade and a cool place for a break in the summer heat. It was at the foot of this tree that head nun Thich Nu Minh Tu found baby Tranh, wrapped in a blanket, cold and hungry. Barely two weeks old, the chances of baby Tranh surviving were low. But Thich Nu Minh Tu did not give up. Today, the sight of Thanh sleeping soundly in her crib warms the heart. Nursed by the nuns’ tender care and love, Thanh is now a healthy 3 month old baby.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
» Audio
» Photo gallery
» Buddhism Dictionary
» Lunar calendar