• “Indian Roots of Tibetan Buddhism” Documentary Wins Award in Madrid

    “Indian Roots of Tibetan Buddhism” Documentary Wins Award in Madrid

    Indian Roots of Tibetan Buddhism, a 2014 documentary by Indian film-maker and conservator Benoy K. Behl, won the Best Documentary Producer Award at the Madrid International Film Festival earlier this month, competing with around 100 other films from 50 countries.
  • The Butcher Who Laid Down His Knife and Became a Buddha

    The Butcher Who Laid Down His Knife and Became a Buddha

    In Chang’an, during Tang dynasty (618–907) times, there was a butcher surnamed Jing. Because Master Shandao urged people to undertake Amitabha-recitation, many had stopped eating meat. Butcher Jing resented him deeply. With a knife in his hand, he entered Shandao’s monastery with the intention of killing the monk.
  • Why a Buddhist Monk Doesn't Need an App to Meditate and Why You Do

    Why a Buddhist Monk Doesn't Need an App to Meditate and Why You Do

    A few years ago I traveled to Nepal to hike in the Himalayas, learn a bit more about myself and about the world from the Buddhist spiritual teachers.
  • Urban Development Threatens Ancient Buddhist Stupa in Pakistan

    Urban Development Threatens Ancient Buddhist Stupa in Pakistan

    An historically significant Buddhist stupa in northeastern Pakistan, which may be as old as the 3rd century BCE, is under threat from urban development and neglect, according to Pakistan’s Department of Archaeology and Museums (DOAM).
  • South Korea Returns Stolen Buddhist Statue to Japan

    South Korea Returns Stolen Buddhist Statue to Japan

    A standing bronze statue of the Tathagata Buddha, one of two ancient Buddhist statues stolen from Japan three years ago by South Korean thieves and designated an important cultural property by the Japanese government, has been returned to the island city of Tsushima in Japan’s Nagasaki Prefecture, the city office said.
  • Dalai Lama Recognizes Successor of Trulshik Rinpoche

    Dalai Lama Recognizes Successor of Trulshik Rinpoche

    His Holiness the Dalai Lama has recognized a two-year-old Tibetan boy born in Nepal as the reincarnation of Kyabje Trulshik Rinpoche, the former head of the Nyingma lineage, the oldest tradition of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism.
  • TBRC Brings Tibetan Manuscripts onto the Google Cultural Institute Platform

    TBRC Brings Tibetan Manuscripts onto the Google Cultural Institute Platform

    The Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center (TBRC) has announced the opening of the TBRC exhibition space on the Google Cultural Institute (GCI) online platform. The TBRC said its partnership with the GCI will enable web users to explore and interact with high-resolution images from selected Tibetan manuscripts.
  • Nepal Starts Work on Developing Buddhist Circuit

    Nepal Starts Work on Developing Buddhist Circuit

    The government of Nepal has said it has formally started work to develop the Greater Lumbini Buddhist Circuit, with the aim of increasing Buddhist-related tourism to the country. It intends to improve facilities and infrastructure on the circuit for pilgrims and tourists, both to boost visitor numbers and to encourage longer stays.    
  • The Buddhist and the Neuroscientist

    The Buddhist and the Neuroscientist

    Dharamsala, India -- In 1992, the neuroscientist Richard Davidson got a challenge from the Dalai Lama. By that point, he’d spent his career asking why people respond to, in his words, “life’s slings and arrows” in different ways. Why are some people more resilient than others in the face of tragedy? And is resilience something you can gain through practice? The Dalai Lama had a different question for Davidson when he visited the Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader at his residence in Dharamsala, India. “He said: ‘You’ve been using the tools of modern neuroscience to study depression, and anxiety, and fear. Why can’t you use those same tools to study kindness and compassion?’ … I did not have a very good answer. I said it was hard.”
  • Commemorating the Centenary of the Birth of Vipassana Meditation Master Munindraji

    Commemorating the Centenary of the Birth of Vipassana Meditation Master Munindraji

    “Whatever you are doing, everything should be done mindfully, dynamically, with totality, completeness, thoroughness. Then it becomes meditation, meaningful, purposeful. It is not thinking, but experiencing from moment to moment, living from moment to moment, without clinging, without condemning, without judging, without evaluating, without comparing, without selecting, without criticizing—choiceless awareness.” - Munindraji (1915–2003) (Knaster 2010, 1)
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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