• The Fiction of the Self: Ruth Ozeki

    The Fiction of the Self: Ruth Ozeki

    “Ultimately, all the creative arts are testaments to the foundational truths of Buddhist principles,” says Canadian-American writer Ruth Ozeki. Whether tracing the themes of interdependence and non-attachment, crafting characters who are Zen Buddhist nuns, or using her meditation practice as a springboard for new work, Ozeki has become a uniquely Buddhist voice in modern fiction.
  • Respected Tibetan Teacher Kyabje Gelek Rinpoche Dies

    Respected Tibetan Teacher Kyabje Gelek Rinpoche Dies

    The influential Tibetan teacher and respected author Kyabje Gelek Rinpoche, a tulku in the Gelugpa school of Vajrayan Buddhism has died. A notice on his Facebook page advised that Gelek Rinpoche had passed away in the early hours of Wednesday morning.
  • Anam Thubten Rinpoche On Non-attachment, Being a Buddhist Gypsy, and Impermanence

    Anam Thubten Rinpoche On Non-attachment, Being a Buddhist Gypsy, and Impermanence

    I truly enjoy my conversations with the quiet, authoritative Anam Thubten Rinpoche, and I was glad to learn last year that he likes coming to Hong Kong to teach. This patient and soft-spoken Nyingma master has a devoted, urbanite, and educated following in the cosmopolitan enclave. “I really enjoy being in Hong Kong and I feel that I’m learning how to teach in Hong Kong and understand more about the culture and people. The people have been wonderful, and the learning experience for me overall and sharing the Dharma has been a source of joy. The people who come to my teachings have been very sincere and intelligent, and I feel that these people really have the capacity to understand the depth of Buddhism,” he told me when we met in December.
  • Pristine Mountain Ecosystems Under Threat from Climate Change, Study Shows

    Pristine Mountain Ecosystems Under Threat from Climate Change, Study Shows

    A new study from an international team of researchers indicates that climate change poses a direct threat to fragile mountain habitats, affecting both glaciers and the proliferation of high-altitude species. The international study, which examined seven of the world’s major mountain regions, which are warming twice as fast as the global average, found that higher temperatures are speeding up microbial activity, and leading to fundamental changes that could displace some plant life and dramatically alter the habitat of others.
  • Thailand Appoints New Supreme Patriarch to Head Monastic Sangha

    Thailand Appoints New Supreme Patriarch to Head Monastic Sangha

    Thailand’s King Maha Vajiralongkorn has appointed Venerable Somdet Phra Maha Muneewonga as the new supreme patriarch, filling the top spot in the Southeast Asian kingdom’s monastic sangha for the first time since the previous office holder passed away in October 2013. A formal appointment ceremony presided over by the king will be held on 12 February at Bankok’s Wat Phra Si Rattana Satsadaram, also known as the Temple of the Emerald Buddha.
  • Singapore Exhibition Sheds Light on Ancient Treasures from Myanmar

    Singapore Exhibition Sheds Light on Ancient Treasures from Myanmar

    Cities and Kings: Ancient Treasures from Myanmar is the latest in a series of special exhibitions on Southeast Asia curated by the Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) in Singapore. The collection of works traces some 2,000 years of cultural development seen through the art and architecture of emergent cities in Myanmar—an appropriate theme as the two countries celebrate 50 years of diplomatic relations. Some 60 artifacts from museums in Myanmar as well as from the ACM and a private collection are also documented in a catalogue, accompanied by essays from the museum’s curators as well as scholars from Myanmar and overseas.*
  • Self-reflection in Kashmir

    Self-reflection in Kashmir

    The world is beset by what are often called “intractable problems.” Agitation and response seem to run in circles of escalating violence, with little apparent creativity in the attempts to resolve these issues. Perhaps it is time to take a moment to pause, to self-reflect on what it would take to change a discussion, to offer a way forward that is not merely a self-righteous rehash of the past? While I was working in the Vale of Kashmir in the summer 2016 with a 700-year-old tradition of satirical performers known as Bhand Pather, whose plays are based on Sufi poetry and social observation, these simmering tensions took a turn for the worse. Eight Indian soldiers were murdered on a bus when militants ambushed an official convoy. Several days later, Burhan Wani, a popular young militant leader, was killed in a gun battle with security personnel, unleashing years of pent-up frustration among the populations of villages in Kashmir as well as the Indian security forces. In this ongoing cycle of violence and retribution, Kashmir is, regrettably, not so unique in the world, but perhaps the world has forgotten the suffering of Kashmir?
  • Prominent Tibetologist and Human Rights Advocate Elliot Sperling Dies

    Prominent Tibetologist and Human Rights Advocate Elliot Sperling Dies

    Professor Elliot Sperling, one of the world’s foremost scholars of Tibetan history and Sino-Tibetan relations, and a prominent advocate for human rights, has died at the age of 66 at his home in Jackson Heights, New York City. Memorial services were held on Saturday evening at Tibet House in New York and in Dharamsala, Northern India on Sunday to commemorate his life and achievements.
  • Myanmar Buddhist Recognizes the Right of All Children to Receive an Education

    Myanmar Buddhist Recognizes the Right of All Children to Receive an Education

    In Myanmar’s strife-torn Rakhine State, where ethnic and religious tensions continue to simmer and segregate the Buddhist and Muslim communities, at least one ethnic Rakhine Buddhist, a 46-year-old school teacher, is willing to bridge this tragic divide that has been defined by violence and bloodshed. Since 2014, Maung Than Shwe has been the headmaster of the Basic Education High School (BEHS) in Thet Kay Pyin village, which is attended by children from one of the state’s biggest internment camps for displaced Muslims.
  • Dharma In The Digital Age: Susan Piver

    Dharma In The Digital Age: Susan Piver

    “It’s not a thrill a minute. You’re not seeing auras and jumping into other dimensions,” says Susan Piver. “Meditation is not a life hack. . . . It’s a way to see clearly.”
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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