• Siddartha's Intent Online Program:

    Siddartha's Intent Online Program: "The Path is the Goal"

    Beginning on 9 October, Siddhartha’s Intent (SI) will begin a six-week online program on the nature and practice of Buddhist meditation. The program will run from 6.30 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. (Australian Eastern Standard Time) every Thursday until 13 November, and will be based on Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche's teaching The Path is the Goal: A Basic Handbook of Buddhist Meditation.
  • Buddha Image Brings Peace to Oakland

    Buddha Image Brings Peace to Oakland

    Buddhist literature indicates that during the final stage of Buddhism in this era, all that will remain of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni’s teachings will be in the form of symbols (Patrul Rinpoche [1998], 27). Precisely where we are in the present cycle of teachings is a subject of debate among scholars who study the course of time and how it is measured. Certainly, though, it has been found that a Buddha image can have a transformative effect on the environment. A recent article in the San Francisco Gate has brought to light just such a marvelous indication of the power of the Buddha’s form.
  • Mantras Played to Rice Crop Stimulate Growth

    Mantras Played to Rice Crop Stimulate Growth

    We all know how different types of music can create an atmosphere, affecting our mood and conjuring up old memories and associations. However, most people probably wouldn’t have thought that music could have a noticeable effect on plants as well. Apparently, this is the case—when farmers in Liangshan village in Fujian Province, southeast China, played Buddhist music to their rice crop, the yield is reported to have increased by 15 per cent.
  • Retreat and

    Retreat and "Rinjung Gyatsa" with Lama Zopa Rinpoche in Australia

    Lama Zopa Rinpoche is currently in Australia until 23 October presenting a series of Dharma talks and leading a month-long retreat. The retreat is hosted by the joint organizing committee of Lama Zopa Australia from three centers—the Atisha Centre, the Great Stupa of Universal Compassion, and the Thubten Shedrup Ling Monastery—and the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT). The last two weeks are a continuation of Lama Zopa’s long-term plan over a number of years to gradually give the 305 Rinjung Gyatsa transmissions, which he first began in 2011.
  • Fourth International Buddhist Conclave to Be Held in India

    Fourth International Buddhist Conclave to Be Held in India

    Tourism Breaking News has reported that India will host the fourth International Buddhist Conclave (IBC) in Bodhgaya and Sarnath from 26–28 September. The conclave is being organized by India’s Ministry of Tourism and the state governments of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, with the aim of promoting Buddhist heritage in India. One of the objectives for the Ministry of Tourism is to create opportunities for new business strategies to market Buddhist heritage. Travel Biz reports that over 300 delegates from 30 countries are expected to participate in the event.
  • One World, One Vision, One People

    One World, One Vision, One People

    New Delhi, India, 22 September 2014 - This morning, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was invited to speak at the Indian Habitat Centre by Rajeev Chandrasekhar MP and the Ashoka University. Mr Chandrasekhar is an independent member of the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Indian Parliament, representing Karnataka and Bangalore. The Ashoka University is a fully residential university whose founders believe that education should be holistic and liberal. In his introduction Mr Chandrasekhar praised His Holiness as someone who espouses peace and co-existence.
  • Zen Teacher Kyogen Carlson Passes Away at 65

    Zen Teacher Kyogen Carlson Passes Away at 65

    On 18 September, noted Zen teacher Kyogen Carlson suffered a heart attack, resulting in his untimely passing. Carlson was on his way to participate in an oryoki ritual (a meditative form of eating originating in Japan), when he suddenly collapsed.
  • A Meeting of Diverse Spiritual Traditions in India - Second Day

    A Meeting of Diverse Spiritual Traditions in India - Second Day

    New Delhi, India, 21 September 2014 - The second day of the Meeting of Diverse Spiritual Traditions in India opened with the second plenary session on the theme ‘Environment, Education and Society’. Moderator Arun Kapur opened discussions with the suggestion that we seem to live in competition with nature. People and nature are not distinct from each other, he said, therefore it is a mistake to try to compete with or conquer nature.
  • A Meeting of Diverse Spiritual Traditions in India - First Day

    A Meeting of Diverse Spiritual Traditions in India - First Day

    New Delhi, India, 20 September 2014 - This morning, well before the announced starting time for the ‘Meeting of Diverse Spiritual Traditions in India’, of which he was host, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was at the door of the hall to greet each of the delegates as they arrived.
  • Buddhacare: An Example of Engaged Buddhism

    Buddhacare: An Example of Engaged Buddhism

    Earlier this year, a new lay organization called Buddhacare was formed in Australia, to fulfill two main objectives: firstly, to act as an umbrella for Australian lay Buddhists, and secondly, to promote Engaged Buddhism as an integral part of Australian daily life. Buddhacare draws inspiration from the belief that Buddhist practice cannot be divorced from social engagement, as exemplified by the Buddha's life.
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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