• Innovative Prayer Competition in Seoul

    Innovative Prayer Competition in Seoul

    Religious prayers are usually considered to involve spirituality and to be ritualistic. However, in a bid to inspire the younger generation by using a different and less traditional approach, on 17 July an innovative prayer competition was held by South Korea’s largest Buddhist organization, the Jogye Order, at a temple in Seoul. More than 300 nuns and monks of the Mahayana tradition participated in the event, using traditional musical instruments such as drums, wooden fish and bells. Much to the surprise of the audience, however, they chanted the numerous Buddhist discourses in a rap and hip-hop style. Many in the audience also followed along with a traditional style of chanting.
  • Founder of Tzu Chi receives Rotary International Honor

    Founder of Tzu Chi receives Rotary International Honor

    On 6 July, Rotary International bestowed the Award of Honor on Buddhist master Cheng Yen, who established the Tzu Chi Foundation in Taiwan in 1966. Master Cheng Yen is the first ethnically Chinese recipient of the award which, according to the Tzu Chi website, was given in honor of her continuous humanitarian efforts and advocacy for world peace. The accolade reflects the Tzu Chi Foundation’s efforts as a whole: volunteers providing “compassionate relief”. Previous recipients include Bill Clinton, Bill Gates, Pranab Mukherjee, and Queen Elizabeth II.
  • Dalai Lama returns to Dharamsala after Kalachakra teachings

    Dalai Lama returns to Dharamsala after Kalachakra teachings

    Dharamsala, HP, India, 21 July 2014 (Hindustan Times) - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama returned to Dharamsala from Delhi after concluding the 33rd Kalachakra teachings at Ladakh. Around 200,000 devotees from 73 countries attended the Kalachakra held from July 3 to 14.
  • 7 Simple Ways of Being Super Productive

    7 Simple Ways of Being Super Productive

    Are you always running up and down trying to sort out issues yet at the end of the day you feel like you still have so much you haven’t accomplished? Do you use the phrase ‘busy as a bee’? If you do, do you think you as productive as the bee? Do you wish the day had 30 hours instead of 24? What is time worth to you? If this is you, here a few tips you could use to ensure that you don’t feel the same way and increase your productivity.
  • Call for Papers: 4th International Conference on Buddhism in the Australasian Region

    Call for Papers: 4th International Conference on Buddhism in the Australasian Region

    The International Conference Buddhism & Australia 2015 will be held in Perth, Western Australia, from 26–28 February. The conference investigates the history of and the current and future directions for Buddhism in Australasia.
  • Dismantling the Kalachakra Sand Mandala, Visiting Educational Projects and a Lunch Hosted by the Muslim Co-ordination Committee, Leh

    Dismantling the Kalachakra Sand Mandala, Visiting Educational Projects and a Lunch Hosted by the Muslim Co-ordination Committee, Leh

    Leh, Ladakh, J&K, India, 16 July 2014 - One of the final events associated with the giving of the Kalachakra Empowerment is the dismantling of the sand mandala. When His Holiness the Dalai Lama arrived at the teaching pavilion this morning, the monks of Namgyal Monastery were already reciting the necessary rituals.
  • Visits to Rudok Monastery & Ladakh Autonomous Hill Development Council, Leh

    Visits to Rudok Monastery & Ladakh Autonomous Hill Development Council, Leh

    Leh, Ladakh, J&K, India, 15 July 2014 - On reaching the teaching pavilion at Shiwatsel this morning, His Holiness the Dalai Lama went directly to the eastern door of the mandala palace and surveyed the sand mandala. Looking up from that he nodded in respect to the grand appliqué thangka of Kalachakra hanging behind the western door.  Then he walked over to where the monks of Namgyal Monastery were reciting Kalachakra rituals, smiled and stepped out to the front of the pavilion. Assembled before him were members of the 9,000 volunteers who had assisted with the successful conduct of the 33rd Kalachakra Empowerment.
  • 6 Surprising Uses Of Cabbage

    6 Surprising Uses Of Cabbage

    If I had asked you a couple of days ago what your favorite foods were, I am sure the list would have not included cabbage. You have to admit you had a bit of prejudice against this crunchy veggie, but after discovering the true tastiness and health benefits of cabbage, you can’t help but change your mind on this nutritious vegetable.
  • Long-life Empowerment and a Long-life Offering to Conclude the 33rd Kalachakra Empowerment

    Long-life Empowerment and a Long-life Offering to Conclude the 33rd Kalachakra Empowerment

    Leh, Ladakh, J&K, India, 14 July 2014 - Last night’s full moon was still setting over the mountains around the Leh Valley this morning as tens of thousands of people converged on the Teaching Ground at Shiwatsel one last time. At about 7am His Holiness the Dalai Lama stepped out of his residence to walk to the Teaching Pavilion, stopping here and there to greet an old acquaintance or comfort an old or infirm person on the way.
  • Final Day of 33rd Kalachakra Empowerment

    Final Day of 33rd Kalachakra Empowerment

    Leh, Ladakh, J&K, India, 12 July 2014 - Today saw the culmination of the 33rd Kalachakra Empowerment. After spending five hours on the preparatory rituals and eating a quick lunch His Holiness the Dalai Lama was ready to begin the final session of the empowerment before midday. He took the time again to greet the huge crowd and salute the Lamas, local dignitaries and other guests before taking his seat on the throne. 
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
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Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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