• Is Life Suffering? The Four Noble Truths in Daily Life: Part One

    Is Life Suffering? The Four Noble Truths in Daily Life: Part One

    When I first came across Buddhism, I heard that the First Noble Truth was “Life is suffering.” I quickly dismissed Buddhism as a pessimistic philosophy. Fortunately, I was later introduced to teachers who taught the Buddha’s path as one of wisdom and of joy, and now I’ve even become a nun! I come back to the Four Noble Truths often, and see that while a lot has been written about them, their daily application is not often discussed. Titled as “Truths,” it’s easy to assume that they are something to believe—but the Buddha’s path is one of experience, not blind faith. With this in mind, I’d like to begin a four-part series exploring the Four Noble Truths in daily life.
  • Japanese Buddhist Temples Adapt to Changing Needs

    Japanese Buddhist Temples Adapt to Changing Needs

    Funerals are out and counseling, cafes, and storytelling are in as Buddhist institutions in Japan rally to attract a younger, more secular generation.
  • Educating Buddhist Children in America

    Educating Buddhist Children in America

    “At the end of the day, education is brainwashing. Brainwashing is inevitable. We human beings love doing that. We are already brainwashed—we don’t know otherwise. So since we are going to brainwash anyway, it’s good to brainwash with good motivation.” - Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche*
  • Theravada Bhikkhuni Order Revived in West Java, Indonesia

    Theravada Bhikkhuni Order Revived in West Java, Indonesia

    The first ordination of an Indonesian bhikkhuni (female Buddhist monastic) in more than a thousand years was held on 21 June, marking the contemporary revival of the Theravada bhikkhuni order in the country.
  • The Dalai Lama Visits Glastonbury Festival

    The Dalai Lama Visits Glastonbury Festival

    The Glastonbury Festival, held near Pilton in Somerset, England, had a special visitor on the morning of 28 June: HH the Dalai Lama. The visit to the popular arts festival was a part of the Tibetan spiritual leader’s four-day trip to the UK, during which he will also give a public talk titled “Buddhism in 21st Century” in Aldershot on 29 June.
  • Action drives

    Action drives "One Billion Acts of Peace"

    Petaling Jaya, Selangor (Malaysia) – Buddhist Gem Fellowship (BGF), a key Dharma learning hub in metro Kuala Lumpur, last night became the center of attention of an abnormal kind. Abnormal because the star attraction was not a well known monk nor a widely revered Rinpoche, but someone who calls himself a Buddhist "on most weekdays, especially Mondays".
  • Bodhism: Conscience and Doctrine in the Thought of Bhikkhu Bodhi

    Bodhism: Conscience and Doctrine in the Thought of Bhikkhu Bodhi

    Before the late 2000s, Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi was not well known as an environmental activist and leader of humanitarian causes. Practitioners of the 1990s and earlier became acquainted with the American-born Theravada monk mainly through his guided meditation and recorded breathing and sitting courses. He was also renowned for his seminal translations and editorship of several major publications of Theravada texts, along with a slew of academic articles and columns too numerous to mention in great detail. His scholarly credentials influenced a variety of fields, spanning early Buddhism to Vinaya law concerning women’s ordination.
  • 14th Sakyadhita International Conference on Buddhist Women Under Way

    14th Sakyadhita International Conference on Buddhist Women Under Way

    The 14th Sakyadhita International Conference on Buddhist Women is currently under way in Yogyakarta on the Indonesian island of Java. The theme of the week-long event, which concludes on 30 June, is “Compassion and Social Justice.”
  • Buddhist-Catholic Dialogue in Italy Focusing on “Suffering, Liberation, and Fraternity”

    Buddhist-Catholic Dialogue in Italy Focusing on “Suffering, Liberation, and Fraternity”

    A five-day dialogue between Catholics and Buddhists from the United States kicked off in Castelgandolfo, near Rome, on 23 June. The dialogue was sponsored by the Bishops’ Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, in collaboration with the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue. The venue was the headquarters of the Focolare Movement, an interfaith organization founded in 1943 by Catholic activist Chiara Lubich (1920–2008).
  • Buddha Footprints Discovered in Chhattisgarh, India

    Buddha Footprints Discovered in Chhattisgarh, India

    A set of Buddha footprints has been found during the excavation of a heritage site at Damroo Village in Baloda Bazaar-Bhatapara District, Chhattisgarh State. The find has led archaeologists to rate the village an important Buddhist site as more than a dozen votive stupas and other valuable artifacts have previously also been found there. According to the director of culture and archaeology in Chhattisgarh, Rakesh Chaturvedi, the footprints represent the first discovery of such significance in central India to date (The Times of India).
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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