• The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi

    It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
  • Buddhists Pray for Peace and Unification Ahead of Inter-Korean Summit

    Buddhists Pray for Peace and Unification Ahead of Inter-Korean Summit

    Ahead of the inter-Korean summit scheduled for next week, Buddhist organizations are meeting in South Korea to pray for peace, stability, and unification on the Korean Peninsula.
  • Buddhist Peace Organization Issues Open Letter Decrying Treatment of Myanmar’s Rohingya

    Buddhist Peace Organization Issues Open Letter Decrying Treatment of Myanmar’s Rohingya

    SEATTLE—The Burmese-American organization Saddha: Buddhists for Peace, which describes itself as “a group dedicated to anti-racism and interfaith solidarity efforts,” has issued “An Open Letter to Burmese Buddhists Concerning the Rohingya” detailing their concern about the ongoing repression of the mostly Muslim ethnic group in eastern Myanmar. The organization is led by a diverse cross-section of Burmese from Buddhist backgrounds, some living in Burma and others outside the country.
  • 9th Century Buddhist Carvings Discovered in Tibet

    9th Century Buddhist Carvings Discovered in Tibet

    On 6 April, Xinhua reported that construction workers building a highway at a junction in Zhag’yab County, Chamdo Prefecture, noticed Buddhist carvings etched on cliffs, located 8 kilometers north of Azixiang township, near the banks of the Leibuqu River. The accidental discovery made while mining for stones in Tibet Autonomous Region may help to shed light on some of the most mysterious and uncertain periods of the Tibetan Empire (7th to 9th centuries CE).
  • Understanding Buddhist Astrology: An Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Kotyk

    Understanding Buddhist Astrology: An Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Kotyk

    Buddhism and astrology might seem to be unrelated fields. Buddhism affords a set of teachings intended to liberate us from cycles of rebirths, while astrology concerns itself with how human activities are affected by the planets. However, astrology appears in Buddhist texts and practices throughout history. Jeffrey Kotyk is one of the few scholars who specializes in this subject. His doctoral thesis at Leiden University in the Netherlands was on “Buddhist Astrology and Astral Magic in the Tang Dynasty” (funded by the Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Dissertation Fellowship and the BDK Canada Fellowship). Originally from Canada, Kotyk completed his MA in Buddhist studies at Komazawa University in Japan. Presently, he is a visiting researcher at the International Consortium for Research in the Humanities (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität) in Germany. In this interview, he elucidates the connections between the two equally fascinating worlds of Buddhism and astrology.
  • Prime Minister of Bhutan Proposes Founding of International Center of Vajrayana Buddhism

    Prime Minister of Bhutan Proposes Founding of International Center of Vajrayana Buddhism

    THIMPHU—Speaking at the International Vajrayana Conference held in the Bhutanese capital Thimphu last week,* the prime minister of Bhutan, Lyonchhen Dasho Tshering Tobgay, proffered a new vision aimed at ensuring the preservation and development of the Vajrayana Buddhist tradition in the 21st century, proposing the establishment of an international center of Vajrayana Buddhism.
  • Chinese Community in Kolkata, India, Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Hsuan Tsang Monastery

    Chinese Community in Kolkata, India, Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Hsuan Tsang Monastery

    On 14 March, the Chinese community in Kolkata, India, celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Hsuan Tsang Monastery. The monastery is named after Xuanzang (602-64), known as Hsuan Tsang in India, a famous Buddhist monk and scholar from China who travelled to India in the seventh century. The monastery was constructed 50 years ago, by the local Chinese community in Kolkata, the capital city of West Bengal.
  • The Growth of Wisdom and Compassion: An Interview with Drukmo Gyal Dakini, Part One

    The Growth of Wisdom and Compassion: An Interview with Drukmo Gyal Dakini, Part One

    In the Buddhist tradition, dakinis are worshiped as female emanations of wisdom that hold the key to the esoteric knowledge of Vajrayana Buddhism and reveal the path to complete freedom. They inspire and assist practitioners on the spiritual path and manifest in different forms beyond time and space. In Tibetan they are referred to as khandroma, which means “she who walks in space,” referring to the fundamental wisdom of emptiness, which is considered a female principle.
  • Archaeologists in China Unearth Sutra Translation by Tang Dynasty Monk Xuanzang

    Archaeologists in China Unearth Sutra Translation by Tang Dynasty Monk Xuanzang

    Archeologists working at an excavation at the Tuyugou Grottoes in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, northwest China, have announced the discovery of a large fragment of ancient text believed to be a copy of the Mahaprajnaparamita Sutra, translated into Chinese by the renowned Tang dynasty (618–907) Buddhist monk, scholar, and traveler Xuanzang.
  • Manifesting the Higher Self: The Mandalas of Burton Kopelow

    Manifesting the Higher Self: The Mandalas of Burton Kopelow

    For the creative artist, painting is the passion in which the soul engages mortal questions of great consequence. The work of art, as it leads us to the Frontiers of Perception, becomes the medium which gives access to New States of Consciousness. Though the art remains the motive force, it becomes less important than the state of mind to which it leads. (Burton Kopelow)
» Buddhism in VietNam
Filling the Emptiness with Love at the Duc Son Orphanage
The open fields of Thuy Bang village offer a refreshing change from the busy traffic and the crowds of tourists one can find just 7 kilometres north of the village in the city of Hue in Central Vietnam. Up a little side road lined with huge shady trees you can find the Duc Son Pagoda. Inside the compound stands a sprawling Bodhi tree, which provides shade and a cool place for a break in the summer heat. It was at the foot of this tree that head nun Thich Nu Minh Tu found baby Tranh, wrapped in a blanket, cold and hungry. Barely two weeks old, the chances of baby Tranh surviving were low. But Thich Nu Minh Tu did not give up. Today, the sight of Thanh sleeping soundly in her crib warms the heart. Nursed by the nuns’ tender care and love, Thanh is now a healthy 3 month old baby.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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