• Meditation Isn't Enough: A Buddhist Perspective on Suicide

    Meditation Isn't Enough: A Buddhist Perspective on Suicide

    San Francisco, CA (USA)  -- The news of Robin Williams' passing is shocking and touching so many of us. I was waiting for a friend at a bar when I first heard. All around me people erupted in a variety of emotional reactions as the word quickly spread. In the time since, a common reaction has been deep sadness, often paired with a sentiment of "I never thought someone like him would kill themselves."
  • 6 Amazing Benefits of Drinking Tea

    6 Amazing Benefits of Drinking Tea

    Nothing is quite as relaxing as enjoying a nice cup of tea. Well, studies have shown that a hot cup of tea can do more than relax you. Although we have known for centuries that tea is associated with many health benefits, we have only just started to investigate it scientifically. Whether green, black or white, the humble tea provides so many benefits to your body. Tea is full of natural substances that improve your health in so many ways. Let us have a look at some of the key benefits that tea drinking can have on your body.
  • Korean Buddhist Committee Urges UNESCO Status for Mountain Temples

    Korean Buddhist Committee Urges UNESCO Status for Mountain Temples

    A new joint committee has been formed by various Buddhist organizations and the Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea to oversee the recognition by UNESCO of South Korean mountain Buddhist temples as World Heritage Sites until June 2018. The committee is led by the Jogye Order, which in July organized a rapping prayer competition in Seoul.
  • Ananda W. P. Guruge, Buddhist Scholar and Professor, Dies at 85

    Ananda W. P. Guruge, Buddhist Scholar and Professor, Dies at 85

    Sri Lankan diplomat and renowned Buddhist scholar Ananda Wahihana Palliya Guruge, 85, passed away in Rosemead, California, on 6 August, following an academic tour in China and Australia. The funeral will be held on 16 August in the Sky Rose Chapel at Rose Hills Memorial Park, Whittier
  • Buddhists and Muslims Join Together for Inter-Religious Harmony

    Buddhists and Muslims Join Together for Inter-Religious Harmony

    Scenes of communal violence between Buddhists and Muslims in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Thailand are persistent and on the rise. In spite of living peacefully together for generations, these two religious communities are now beset by riots, looting, destruction of property, injuries, and death. Each side is demonizing the other, provoking the escalating tension and violence.
  • Guggenheim Museum Presents Wang Jianwei:

    Guggenheim Museum Presents Wang Jianwei: "Time Temple"

    From 31 October 2014 through 16 February 2015, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will present Wang Jianwei: Time Temple, an immersive exhibition of new work by the Beijing-based artist and his first solo museum exhibition in North America. Wang is recognized within China for his bold conceptual practice and vital contributions to the avant-garde and experimental art movements of the reform era that spans the early 1980s to the present day. Informed by critical theory and philosophy, his work links formal concerns about art making and process with inquiries into contemporary society and the experience of time.
  • Sanchi University of Buddhist-Indic Studies Opens Doors to New Students

    Sanchi University of Buddhist-Indic Studies Opens Doors to New Students

    Sanchi University of Buddhist-Indic Studies (SUBIS) formally opened in April 2014 and will be starting the academic year with six courses from October onwards. It was established at Sanchi (Madhya Pradesh) on 21 September 2012. Samdhong Rinpoche, the former director of the Central Institute of Tibetan Studies (now the Central University of Tibetan Studies) as well as the first directly elected Kalon Tripa of the Central Tibetan Administration, has been appointed SUBIS’s chancellor. Professor Shashiprabha Kumar is the first vice-chancellor.
  • 5 Reasons You Are Bad At Whatever You Are Doing

    5 Reasons You Are Bad At Whatever You Are Doing

     What follows are 5 reasons you are bad at whatever you are doing and understanding why this is indeed the case is important if you are to ever improve. In all honesty, we are often bad at something because of us making tiny errors on a regular basis or perhaps we are just not cut out for it in the same way as some people are good at sports while others are just not as athletic. However, hopefully by reading these five reasons it will give you renewed confidence in what you do.
  • Buddhists in Malaysia Mourn MH17

    Buddhists in Malaysia Mourn MH17

    On 20 July, more than 100 Buddhists as well as secular groups came together at the Sri Jayanti temple in Malaysia to mourn the untimely end of flight MH17. Evening prayers are being held daily at the temple, located in Jalan Sentul, for two weeks.
  • Top 6 Foods For Healthy Eyes And Better Vision

    Top 6 Foods For Healthy Eyes And Better Vision

    Staying healthy obviously involves keeping a healthy diet and an active lifestyle. This usually refers to a healthy heart, strong bones and a healthy, slim body. But keeping healthy also implies taking care of vision, our most important asset. After all, seeing well into the future requires healthy eyes and, most certainly, after reaching an old age, many people develop vision problems. Issues such as cataracts, dry eyes or other ocular disease may be prevented by following simple eating guidelines and basically “keeping an eye” on healthy foods. Here is a rundown of some of the best foods for healthy eyes and better vision:
» Buddhism in VietNam
Hue Buddhists hold annual ceremony
Feb 08 -- THUA THIEN - HUE (VNS)  — Thousands of people gathered yesterday at Huong Van Zen Monastery in central Thua Thien - Hue Province to pray to King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258-1308) for peace and prosperity.
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Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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