• Vesak Celebration: Vatican’s Message Asks Buddhists and Christians to Promote Peace, Nonviolence

    Vesak Celebration: Vatican’s Message Asks Buddhists and Christians to Promote Peace, Nonviolence

    The Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue (PCID) of the Roman Curia released message on 22 April on the occasion of the Buddhist celebration of Vesak. The message calls on Buddhists and Christians to walk together to promote peace and nonviolence. The Vatican’s letter, titled “Christians and Buddhists: Walking Together on the Path of Nonviolence,” starts with the salutation “Dear Buddhist Friends,”.and is signed by PCID president Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran and secretary Fr. Miguel Ángel Ayuso Guixo. (Vatican Radio)
  • Kondañña’s Earth-shattering Education

    Kondañña’s Earth-shattering Education

    There is a detail I have been pondering this semester. At least, it appears to be a detail, but it is one that challenges the very fabric of what education means to me. It arises near the end of an important Pali sutta. Poetically, I find myself at the end of a long semester. There is something fitting in that.
  • Exquisite Ancient Buddha Image from Mes Aynak to be Exhibited at National Museum of Afghanistan

    Exquisite Ancient Buddha Image from Mes Aynak to be Exhibited at National Museum of Afghanistan

    An ancient Buddha statue in a remarkable state of preservation—removed from one of the most dangerous regions of Afghanistan and believed to date to at least the 2nd century BCE—is set to go on permanent display in the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul.
  • Eight Boys Ordained as Monks in Seoul Ahead of Celebrations to Mark Buddha’s Birthday

    Eight Boys Ordained as Monks in Seoul Ahead of Celebrations to Mark Buddha’s Birthday

    In preparation for celebrations in South Korea to mark the birth of the Buddha—this year observed on 3 May—eight boys, aged 5–7, were temporarily ordained in a traditional Buddhist ceremony at Jogye Temple in Seoul.
  • His Holiness the 103rd Gaden Tripa, Head of the Gelug School, Passes Away

    His Holiness the 103rd Gaden Tripa, Head of the Gelug School, Passes Away

    The 103rd Gaden Tripa, His Holiness Jetsun Lobsang Tenzin, the spiritual head of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism, has passed away at the age of 80, the Central Tibetan Administration announced. Rinpoche had recently been admitted to the intensive care unit of Max Hospital in New Delhi after several months of illness. 
  • Buddhist New Year: Celebrating by Temporary Ordination in Myanmar

    Buddhist New Year: Celebrating by Temporary Ordination in Myanmar

    While many people in South and Southeast Asia last week welcomed the Buddhist New Year by spraying copious amounts of water over each other, for Buddhists in Myanmar the festival is also a time for spiritual enrichment as many women spend the week-long holiday as temporarily ordained nuns.
  • MBA Monk Aims to Rejuvenate Japan’s Buddhist Temples

    MBA Monk Aims to Rejuvenate Japan’s Buddhist Temples

    Amid a marked decline in interest in Buddhism in Japan, 37-year-old Shokei Matsumoto, a monk from Komyo-ji, a temple in central Tokyo, wants to reverse that decline aand spread the Dharma in less traditional ways, by making Buddhist temples relevant to Japan’s overworked and aging population.
  • Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche: Science Shows Meditation Can Improve Our Quality of Life

    Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche: Science Shows Meditation Can Improve Our Quality of Life

    Tibetan meditation master Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche has long been a vocal advocate for the benefits of meditation, and in a recent interview he underscored the growing scientific evidence that supports his teachings.
  • US Buddhists Call for a United Stand Against Injustice and Suffering

    US Buddhists Call for a United Stand Against Injustice and Suffering

    United States-based Buddhist journal Lion’s Roar has announced a compassionate call to action in response to the crisis in US politics. Authored by 13 noted Buddhist teachers and supported by more that 120 practitioners,* the initiative urges Buddhists and people of all faiths to “take a stand against policies of the new administration that will create suffering for the most vulnerable in society.” (Lions Roar)
  • Concerning Right Action and Right Livelihood

    Concerning Right Action and Right Livelihood

    What are Right Action and Right Livelihood according to the teachings of the Buddha?
» Buddhism in VietNam
Celebrating Buddha's birthday in Vietnam
HA NOI (VNS)— The Viet Nam Buddhist Sangha (VBS) held a grand ceremony at the Ha Noi-based Quan Su Pagoda yesterday to celebrate Lord Buddha's 2557th birthday.
» Media
Secret Tibetan Book of the Dead | History Channel Documentary
Bardo Thodol: The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State, it is often referred to in the West by the more casual title, Tibetan Book of the Dead, a name which draws a parallel with the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, another funerary text. The Tibetan text describes, and is intended to guide one through, the experiences that the consciousness has after death, during the interval between death and the next rebirth. This interval is known in Tibetan as the bardo. The text also includes chapters on the signs of death, and rituals to undertake when death is closing in, or has taken place. It is the most internationally famous and widespread work of Tibetan Nyingma literature. According to Tibetan tradition, the Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State was composed in the 8th century by Padmasambhava, written down by his primary student, Yeshe Tsogyal, buried in the Gampo hills in central Tibet and subsequently discovered by a Tibetan terton, Karma Lingpa, in the 14th century.[7][8] There were variants of the book among different sects.[9] The Tibetan Book of the Dead was first published in 1927 by Oxford University Press. Dr. Walter Y. Evans-Wentz chose this title because of the parallels he found with the Egyptian Book of the Dead.[10] The Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State is recited by Tibetan Buddhist lamas over a dying or recently deceased person, or sometimes over an effigy of the deceased. The name means literally "liberation through hearing in the intermediate state".
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