The Applied Chan Teachings of Master Lin-Chi
16/06/2017 17:54 (GMT+7)
It is often said in Chan literature that there are 84,000 doors to the practice and 84,000 obstructions. The door that resonates with my practice are the teachings of Master Lin-Chi. “Teachings” is a misnomer, however, as there is nothing to teach and no one to learn. 
Metta’s Magic Tricks
06/03/2018 09:01 (GMT+7)
When I’m asked about my favourite aspect of meditation practice and location-independence—a combination I like to call lily padding—I often surprise people with my answer: it is the Dharma’s metta magic tricks.

Book Review: Why Buddhism is True: The Science and Philosophy of Meditation and Enlightenment
14/02/2018 15:24 (GMT+7)
Mindfulness meditation has earned a big following in the West in recent years, thanks in large part to its therapeutic benefits. It is no surprise, therefore, that Robert Wright, a best-selling science journalist, would be drawn to this fascinating and occasionally contentious subject.
Creating a Compassionate Civilization: An Interview with Robertson Work
09/02/2018 18:02 (GMT+7)
It’s clear to most of us these days that compassion is a much-needed quality in the world. But what actually is it? And how can we help it grow and develop around us? In recent decades in North America, a growing number of Buddhists have recognized the need to bring Buddhism “off the cushion” and out into the world. For many, this call has been inspired by the Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh, and for some by the pioneering efforts of the Indian reformer Dr. B. R. Ambedkar. But for others, there is simply a direct realization that their values of compassion and wisdom mean little if they do not translate into action.

Taiwan Launches New Initiative to Promote Green Funerals
08/02/2018 16:11 (GMT+7)
HONG KONG—The Civil Affairs Bureau of Taichung City in western Taiwan has launched a “Card of a Fulfilled Life” as part of an initiative to promote environmentally friendly funerals and to encourage funeral autonomy—enabling people to express funerary preferences that may differ from traditional expectations.
The Story of the Sixth Patriarch: Hui Neng/Eno Daikan
04/02/2018 11:43 (GMT+7)
The Sixth Chinese patriarch is called Hui Neng in Chinese and Eno Daikan in Japanese. He lived 638-713 C.E. originating from Southern China and lived through the ‘flowering’ of Zen during the Tang dynasty.

The Big Uncertainty
02/02/2018 11:49 (GMT+7)
Imagine that you lived a few hundred or even a few thousand years ago. If you had told people then that there are going to be bad times for a while and that good times will follow, and the ups and downs will continue, it’s almost certain that your words would withstand the test of time and you might be remembered as a wise person who could predict the future of nations. This has to do with fact that almost every country in the world goes through ebbs and flows of well-being. Today, we are facing an unprecedented situation in which no one can predict the future of humanity at large. It’s not a great time for anyone who wants to be a wise man or woman giving predictions to dispel the public’s fear of the unknown. It seems that our brains have a bias against the unknown and constantly seek certainty. These neurological traits are very difficult to change. By comparison being a fortune teller or palm reader in the modern day would be a much easier job since their work only involves predicting the future for individuals.
Japanese Monk Promotes Cleaning as a Path to Well-being
26/01/2018 11:41 (GMT+7)
Japanese Buddhist monk Shoukei Matsumoto takes cleaning very seriously. In fact, he views it as an essential part of a healthy, positive life and Buddhist practice, going so far as to author a book on the subject that has become a bestseller in his native Japan and has recently been translated into English. 

Regaining Our Simplicity and Humanity: Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche on Practice in Modern Times
25/01/2018 19:01 (GMT+7)
On 1 November, Buddhistdoor Global caught up with Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche for a conversation about the authentic practice of Buddhism in today’s ever more complex world. Born on 30 June 1993 in Nepal, Rinpoche is the incarnation of the late Vajrayana master and Nyingma head Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910–91). Educated in Bhutan and having all the empowerments that Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche received, he is intimately aware of the challenges facing Buddhism in today’s times. He is a deeply compassionate and perceptive teacher committed to the future of Buddhism.
Jhamtse Gatsal: Fostering Seeds of Compassion
23/01/2018 18:56 (GMT+7)
In the late 1990s, Lobsang Phuntsok was one of 10 Buddhist monks selected by His Holiness the Dalai Lama to undertake a two-year training program in India specifically for monks that would then travel to the West to teach Buddhism. A teacher from the Gelugpa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism with exceptional language skills, Lobsang was invited by one of the rinpoches from Sera Jay Monastery in India in 2000 to translate for him during the UN Millennium Peace Conference in New York.

Maia Duerr: Zen, Life, and Livelihood
18/01/2018 14:25 (GMT+7)
Maia Duerr has worked as a qualitative researcher, an anthropologist, a writer, and an editor. She served as the research director of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society (CMIND) from 2002–04 and as the executive director of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship from 2004–07. In 2010, she wrote an introduction to engaged Buddhism for the PBS movie The Buddha, and launched a blog called the Liberated Life Project that same year. This past December she released the book, Work that Matters: Create a Livelihood That Reflects Your Core Intention (Parallax Press, 2017). This month we interviewed Maia about her life and her new book.
Approaching the Precepts and Monastic Rules
12/01/2018 14:07 (GMT+7)
When one begins learning the process of meditation, there are a number of things one must first be aware of, and preparations one should make. Since no one rooted in this world is as yet perfect, the Buddha saw that before one can attain and maintain mindfulness (Pali: sati), one has to develop a firm foundation in morality (sila) on the Noble Eightfold Path.

Buddhistdoor View: Revisiting Resolutions for Buddhist Media in 2018
10/01/2018 18:25 (GMT+7)
Our little blue planet has commenced a new orbit around our grand and ancient star. We have 365 new days to make 2018 a meaningful year that brings joy, comfort, and insight to as many people around us as possible. It’s perhaps best to approach New Year resolutions in this spirit: rather than worrying necessarily about specific targets, we should look at how we can make peace with habit patterns and neuroses that hinder us from “being well and being good.” Our resolutions should help us embody good examples, whether at the individual or collective level.
The Big Uncertainty
03/01/2018 12:50 (GMT+7)
Imagine that you lived a few hundred or even a few thousand years ago. If you had told people then that there are going to be bad times for a while and that good times will follow, and the ups and down will continue, it’s almost certain that your words would withstand the test of time and you might be remembered as a wise person who could predict the future of nations. This has to do with fact that almost every country in the world goes through ebbs and flows of well-being. Today, we are facing an unprecedented situation in which no one can predict the future of humanity at large. It’s not a great time for anyone who wants to be a wise man or woman giving predictions to dispel the public’s fear of the unknown. It seems that our brains have a bias against the unknown and constantly seek certainty. These neurological traits are very difficult to change. By comparison being a fortune teller or palm reader in the modern day would be a much easier job since their work only involves predicting the future for individuals.

The Unskillful Use of Social Media
02/01/2018 20:03 (GMT+7)
From as early as the Frankfurt School, dialectic philosopher Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979) pondered what role technology would play in human emancipation. Conversely, because it was developed within a certain ideological structure and culture, technology itself could be an oppressive form of ideology that contributes to domination more than freedom. Marcuse specifically identified the American culture of his age as one of domination, violence, and consumption as people’s compensation for alienation as cogs in the capitalist machine.
The Buddha’s Four New Year’s Resolutions
01/01/2018 12:50 (GMT+7)
Most New Year’s resolutions are predicated on not being happy enough, or not having what we want, or needing to be prettier, or thinner, or more organized. But what if we began with accepting ourselves with maitri, or loving-kindness, and extended that genuine happiness outward?

Lin-chi and the True Man without Rank
16/12/2017 18:41 (GMT+7)
One of the greatest Zen Masters of all time, who spoke powerfully to awaken without compromise, was Ch'an Master Lin-chi I-hsuan Hui-chao (Japanese, "Rinzai Gigen"). His recorded sayings, encounters and travels are preserved in the Lin-chi lu (Japanese, Rinzai-roku). The translation I'm using here is by Ruth Fuller Sasaki, working with a team of Japanese and American scholars, published in 1975 by the Institute for Zen Studies in Kyoto. It is a scholarly, rigorous work, yet preserves the color and vitality of the original language and dialogue.
Happiness Before Profit: Bhutan Seeks to Redefine Business Using Buddhist Values
16/12/2017 15:26 (GMT+7)
Bhutan, a remote Vajrayana Buddhist kingdom perched in the rarified air of the eastern Himalayas, is regularly ranked among the happiest countries in the world. With a population of fewer than 800,000 people, it is also one of the world’s smallest and least industrialized countries, yet it has significant experience in maintaining the delicate balance of managing economic growth in a sustainable manner, famously encapsulated in its conservative “Gross National Happiness” (GNH) approach to economic development.

Buddhistdoor View: A Devotional Approach to Preserving Buddhism’s Treasures
10/12/2017 17:55 (GMT+7)
Over the past 48 years, conservator and consultant Ann Shaftel has posed a difficult question during interviews she had with many a great master, and with monks and nuns, thangka artists, and scholars: “Take a thangka that has been used in a monastery for many years and was featured in transmissions, empowerments, and has been blessed by many teachers. Say it ended up in Paris in a collector’s home, and the collector put it in their office space or living room, would it still maintain its sacred nature? Or, would it keep its sacred nature if it were collected by a museum and displayed in a sterile gallery without a contextual description?”
The Positive Impact of Mindfulness
01/12/2017 15:54 (GMT+7)
Within the last few decades, mindfulness has become a trend that is sweeping the world. Today, people from different walks of life and various institutions are embracing the practice—mainly due to the fact that its undeniable benefits have been proven by modern science. Those who practice mindfulness have found that it can help them to achieve mental wellbeing, which includes reducing stress and finding inner peace. You would think that everyone would praise its popularity, but this is not the case. There are those who criticize the global popularity of mindfulness for various reasons: it is not the true Dharma that has the potential to bring about things like satori (awakening), or it’s a watered down version of the Dharma that is lacking in ethical principles. At the same time, there are also respected Buddhist teachers who feel that even some popularized versions of mindfulness have the power to bring us to a higher state of consciousness. Believe it or not, some might criticize it because they themselves don’t know so much about meditation. 

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